Feature | 02/16/2017

ECO NEWSLETTER 2.16.17

Meet Alumni Next Week!

Feature | 05/01/2017

UVA Feature: Clement Bohr, Distinguished major, Class of 2017

Photo by Dan Addison, University Communications

Feature | 06/07/2018

How to Answer "The Difficult Team Member" Question

One of the more common behavioral interview questions is “Tell me about a time you had a conflict with a coworker and how you dealt with it.” A similar question is “Tell me about a time you were on a team and team member wasn’t pulling his or her weight and how you addressed the situation.” While these questions are slightly different, they’re both looking for the same thing: how you work in teams and how you deal with conflict. 

Feature | 02/07/2017

Prof. Pepper et al.: Decade long study on Virginia Mental Health Services

Research gathered by several collaborators, including UVA Prof. John Pepper, former UVA Prof. Steve Stern (SUNY Stony Brook), and ECON Grads: William C. Johnson, Michael LaForest, Brett Lissenden. Part 1: https://news.virginia.edu/content/what-economists-learned-tracking-services-virginians-mental-illness  Part 2: https://news.virginia.edu/content/more-66000-virginians-arent-getting-crucial-mental-health-services-study-finds

Feature | 10/05/2018

Joaquin Saldain Wins Tipton Snavely Award for Outstanding Summer Research

Third year PhD student Joaquin Saldain won the Economic Department's Tipton Snavely Award for Best Summer Paper (an honor he shares with Ga Young Ko). Joaquin describes the key issues and findings in his paper, High-cost Consumer Lending: Evidence and Theory​, as follows: "High-cost consumer lending, e.g. payday loans in the U.S., typically charge an APR of 322% for small, short-term loans. It is often discussed whether they cause more harm than good but the current literature has not provided a clear answer. In this paper, I make two contributions that will be key in addressing the welfare effect of payday lending. Firstly, I document facts on households that take out payday loans. These households have low wealth and liquidity levels, relatively low income, high demand for credit and are more likely to have higher than expected expenditures or unemployment spells. In the second place, I develop a model of banking and payday lending that delivers, in equilibrium, an interest rate and loan size spread between these lenders as observed in the data."  

Feature | 10/29/2018

Professor Anton Korinek discusses artificial intelligence and its economic effects with UVA Today

Feature | 01/26/2018

Christopher J. Ruhm, Professor of Public Policy and Economics, finds availability at the source of the opioid epidemic

Feature | 07/13/2017

Aaron Phipps presents at the APPAM on July 13, 2017

"The Role of Production Uncertainty in Teacher Performance Pay: Theory and Experimental Evidence", presented at the International Conference of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) on July 13

Teacher performance incentives have not had consistently positive effects in the U.S. A necessary theoretical and empirical problem is how to design an incentive to induce the optimal allocation of effort among multiple tasks, which is usually modeled by assuming agents know the production function. Unlike some production processes in which output relies solely on worker skill and effort, teaching is distinguished by its complexity and its dependence on the reciprocal effort of students. The result is a context in which individual teachers are uncertain about the net marginal productivity of inputs. The innovation of this paper is to develop a model in which uncertainty about the production process in student learning (“production uncertainty”) is incorporated explicitly in the model of behavior and to assess agent responses to different incentive schemes in a laboratory experiment.

Feature | 08/12/2016

Tech Careers for Liberal Arts Students

Is it possible to have a Tech career with a Liberal arts degree? Yes it is!

Feature | 09/12/2018

Econ Grads Soccer Match, a Yearly Tradition

It is a yearly tradition for current Econ graduate students to meet, greet, and challenge the incoming class to a friendly soccer game. Current students include Hunda 'Hazard' Kebede, Abiy 'The Ankle Breaker' Teshome and Joaquin 'El Matatopos' Saldain, among other stars. After this first dust-up, new students are invited to join the Econ Grad soccer mailing list and team. Though you couldn't tell from this picture, this 2018 game was a co-ed event, and we hope that in future years, more female students will participate!

 

 

Feature | 11/28/2016

In Memoriam: Robert Dewitt Tollison (1942-2016)

Robert Tollison, who received his PhD from UVa in 1969, died on October 24, 2016. Bob was a student of Jim Buchanan, taught at Cornell, then was on the faculty for many years at George Mason, and ended his career at Clemson.  Bob's a former president of the Southern Economic Association and the Public Choice Society and may well have the longest publication list of any Ph.D. from our department.

See his obituary here: http://newsstand.clemson.edu/in-memoriam-robert-dewitt-tollison/

Feature | 11/15/2018

What to Say in Your Cover Letter

What to Say in Your Cover Letter

For someone new to the job market, it can be difficult to determine what to include on both the résumé and cover letter. You may feel that you have no experience to include, and your work experience could be non-existent or very limited.

When composing your cover letter, keep its purpose in mind: The cover letter is written to a specific position, aims to persuade the reader to read the resume, and asks for an interview. Your cover letters will be different each time you send one out. Maintaining the right focus will help you determine what to include in the letter. The type of letter will also help you focus: Are you writing to a recruiter or to a blind job posting? What you know of your audience will also help you focus your letter. Finally, your company research will guide you toward a direction appropriate for that particular opening or desired opening.

Just as you did when writing your résumé, review everything you learned about yourself through your assessments. What are your core values? What is your personality profile? What are your best skills? Why are you drawn to this profession? Put all this information in front of you, and review which aspects from your assessments are best suited to this particular position at this particular company. Also consider which characteristics the reader will likely be looking for. If you are responding to a job post, the post itself can often give some clues. Avoid repeating the desired information word-for-word, but do speak to those requests in the cover letter.

After drafting the letter, if you feel you are repeating the same information that is on the resume, use the same information in the body of your letter, but word it or present it differently. Look for information that you can summarize in one sentence instead of the two or three bulleted points you have on your résumé. Did you work summer jobs in sales? How much did you contribute to the bottom line overall? Were you repeatedly in leadership roles on school projects? Instead of listing each project, combine your experience in one pack-it-with-a-punch sentence. And if all else fails, focus hard on presenting your best accomplishments in a new way, but be wary of overusing your thesaurus.

Also consider how the same information can be presented in a different format. Quantifiable information that is listed as dollar figures on the resume can possible shown as a percentage in the cover letter, particularly if it is a figure that shows growth or some type of (positive) change.

For those who are new to the working world, focus on the educational background, volunteer activities, summer or part-time jobs, and any clubs or memberships that may be applicable. Review your background in all of these areas to see which should be stressed in the letter you are composing. Again, include the information that best meets the needs of the employer, and use that as a guide.

Feature | 01/24/2018

ARTICLE - HOW TO WRITE A RESUME TO BEAT AN AUTOMATED TRACKING SYSTEM

"The majority of applications for many jobs never get seen by a human. If you've ever submitted an application through a company's website, there's a strong chance that your resume was screened—and likely rejected—by an automated system. Here are some tips to help make sure that your resume makes it through in future, so that it can at least get its six seconds with a real live human." - Phil Stott

 

Click here to read the rest of the article. 

Feature | 02/03/2017

Beating Corruption with Technology

"More than 1.9 billion individuals in the developing world benefit from social safety net programs: noncontributory transfer programs that distribute cash or basic in-kind products to the poor. But despite their importance, high levels of corruption often stifle the effectiveness of these programs. If cash transfer programs are particularly prone to graft, then in-kind programs should be preferred in practice. In a recent paper, Muralidharan et al [UVA Prof. Sandip Sukhtankar, and UC San Diego Profs Karthik Muralidharan & Paul Niehaus] report evidence to the contrary by showing that use of a modern banking technology—biometric smart cards—can help to drastically reduce corruption in cash transfer programs."- Rema Hanna

Feature | 12/11/2018

Ben Hamilton Finds Conference Presentations Excellent Preparation for the Job Market

On October 6, at the 74th Midwest International Trade Conference at Vanderbilt University,  I presented my job market paper, “Learning, Externalities, and Export Dynamics,” in a 25-minute talk to an audience of economists studying international trade. In November, I presented my job market paper twice at different venues in Washington D.C.  First, at the 88th Southern Economic Association annual meeting, where I received constructive feedback on a condensed 15-minute version of my talk from students and professors of varied concentrations. Next, at the second Mid-Atlantic International Trade Workshop, hosted by the Federal Reserve Board, I presented a longer, 40-minute version of my talk and benefited from helpful comments and discussion with other trade economists.  Having the opportunity to present my talk in a variety of formats, receive questions from audiences unfamiliar with me and my work, and network with many people in my field was a valuable experience, particularly as I prepare to go on the job market during the next few months.  

Feature | 05/11/2017

NFL player, Chris Long stops by to talk to ECON 4430 students

On April 13th NFL player, Chris Long stopped by to talk to students in ECON 4430: Environmental Economics about his foundation’s work bringing water wells to East Africa

Feature | 07/02/2017

ARTICLE- 15 WORDS YOU SHOULD NEVER USE IN A JOB INTERVIEW

"Receiving an invitation for a job interview can be an exciting time – especially after you’ve been job-searching for a while.

Unfortunately, it’s all too easy to kill off all your chances of getting a job by saying just a few wrong words during your job interview.

To make sure your job interview leads to the next round or a job offer, here’s a list of words which you should aim to avoid."-Steven McConnell

Click here to read the rest of the article

Feature | 09/23/2016

Networking for Economics majors- Part 2 of 2

Part 2 of two articles for Economics majors, written by Professor Bill Conerly.

Feature | 11/23/2016

Midwest Macro conference: Jorge Miranda-Pinto

"This is definitely a great conference for macroeconomists and graduate students working on research. I could interact with Macroeconomists and students from all over the world (U Chicago, Northwester U, Feds, IMF, Bank of Canada, U Warwick, U de Chile, U Hong Kong, World Bank, etc). I attended very interesting sessions and learned a lot about the frontier of macroeconomic research, e,g. explaining the sources of inequality, monitoring financial institution to control systemic risk, predicting future crisis, etc. I received great feedback on my research, not only during my presentation, but also talking to economists throughout the conference. 

I presented my Job Market Paper "Sectoral Connectivity, Volatility, and Downturns: Lessons From Cross-Country Data". In this paper, I find that in emerging countries higher inter-connectivity among sectors of the economy (density of connections) is associated with higher volatility and sharper macroeconomic downturns. I observe the opposite for the group of developed economies, where denser sectoral connections are associated with lower volatility and milder downturns. I then build a multi sector model that, unlike existing models, has a role for the density of connections in shaping aggregate fluctuations. The key for the model to deliver the facts is that emerging economies have less flexible production technologies (manufacturing-intensive economies) while developed economies have more flexible technologies (service-intensive economies). The model implies that during downturns emerging economies with denser connections face constraints in the use of intermediate inputs, while developed economies with sparser connections face constraints in the use of labor."

Feature | 01/31/2017

ARTICLE- THIS LINKEDIN RECRUITER'S TIPS FOR SHOWCASING SOFT SKILLS ON JOB INTERVIEWS

"If you’ve heard a lot about “soft skills” lately, it’s at least partly because employers want you to develop them. According to our Global Recruiting Trends study here at LinkedIn, more employers are rolling out “soft skills assessments” to test job candidates on the cognitive and personality qualities you don’t go to school to learn: critical thinking, adaptability, learning agility, communication, etc. By all indications, these factors aretrading at a higher value in 2017 than they have in the past."-Brendan Browne

Click here to read the rest of the article

Feature | 09/29/2016

Top 10 Jobs for Economics Majors

Read about 10 jobs that match up with many of the skills Economics majors are equipped with: https://www.thebalance.com/top-jobs-for-economics-majors-2059650

Note, although this article includes a Top Ten List, the ECO does not claim that these are the "Top Ten" jobs for majors. This list is meant to be one resource in your search and provide food for thought.

Feature | 08/12/2016

Brexit and Your Next Interview

Be prepared to discuss Brexit in your next interview. The question will surely come up and you will want to be fully prepared to discuss it knowledgeably. 

Feature | 08/30/2018

Fox News: Is America's economy crushing it?

Q: What’s So Special about This Article?
A: There are several potential employers included, which were sources of information for the piece. How many can you find?

A sustainable economic recovery is getting harder to dispute. Read the full story here.

Full story

Feature | 07/11/2018

Dan Savelle Selected to Present at ZEW Conference

Graduate student Daniel Savelle was selected to present his paper “Discrete Choices with (and without) Ordered Search” at the 16th ZEW Conference on the Economics of Information and Communication Technologies in Mannheim, Germany. Dan presented his theoretical research that relates ordered search with classic discrete choice. Other interesting topics presented at the conference included platform economics, bias in review systems, analysis of social media, and machine learning. This conference blends theoretical, empirical and policy oriented research to provide cutting-edge results pertaining to the digital economy.

 

 

Feature | 01/20/2017

ARTICLE- ARE YOU, LIKE, SAYING SOMETHING WITHOUT, LIKE, KNOWING THAT IT'S, LIKE, HURTING YOUR CAREER

"My bet is anyone born during the 1970s likely does it at least 10 times a day. Anyone born during the 1980s likely does it at least 20 times a day. And anyone born after 1990 probably has no clue that they do it close to 100 times a day. What I'm referring to is using the word "like," and using it incorrectly at that. And, like, it is not such a good thing. In fact, it is likely, like, hurting you in, like, interviews, meetings, and, like, pretty much any other work-related setting where you have to speak. Here's why: When you use the word "like" as a filler word or improperly, you typically come across as unengaged in what you're speaking about, unintelligent, nervous, indecisive, and as someone who's lacking a mastery of the English language."-Derek Loosvelt

Click here to read the rest of the article

Feature | 01/11/2017

Article - 6 Signs that You're Living in an Entrepreneurial Society

In his landmark 1985 book, Innovation and Entrepreneurship, famed author and educator Peter Drucker wrote about an entrepreneurial society and its impact on economic development. “Entrepreneurship rests on a theory of economy and society,” he wrote. “The theory sees change as normal and indeed as healthy. And it sees the major task in society — and especially in the economy — as doing something different rather than doing better what is already being done.” What does it mean, then, to live in a society that is becoming more entrepreneurial? I see six major signs: Read more here...

 

https://hbr.org/2016/10/6-signs-youre-living-in-an-entrepreneurial-society?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=harvardbiz

Feature | 12/06/2018

7 Jobs with the Best Employment Prospects in 2019

New technologies are popping up daily, and automation is on the rise. The result is a labor market that’s evolving at a dizzying rate, with certain roles becoming redundant and others (some of which didn’t exist a decade ago) becoming increasingly important. It goes without saying that if you want to remain relevant amid all the flux, the answer lies with the latter positions. 

Below, you’ll find the seven occupations that employers will be placing the most value on in 2019 and beyond. If you’re already working in these fields, then you’re in luck—the future looks especially bright for you. And if you’re currently considering a career change, or you’re about to embark on studies, then take note—these are the 2019 jobs that are most worth pursuing. 

1. Data Scientists

Become a data scientist or analyst, and you’ll have companies everywhere begging you to work for them. As industries across the board start to realize the importance of basing business decisions on collected data, they’ll be looking to hire professionals who are adept at using machine learning and other digital tools to conduct statistical analyses and derive meaningful insights from numbers. Those professionals with expertise in AI, data visualization and communication, and big data storage are especially sought after. And as there’s a major skills shortage in this field across the U.S., data science specialists can demand a rather high salary.

2. Web and Software Developers

For obvious reasons, the IT and computer science sectors will continue to see major hiring increases, and two roles that aren’t going anywhere are those of web and software developer. The need for professionals who can research, design, code, and maintain websites and software programs is driven by the growth of the e-commerce market and the rising demand for mobile apps, advanced operating systems, and online games. As the digital world continues to develop at a rapid rate, a growing number of businesses and government entities are relying on the services of developers to keep up with the times.

3. Sales Representatives with Specialized Knowledge

Another one of the 2019 jobs that’s bound to hold a lot of heat for jobseekers is that of sales representative, but particularly within novel, niche fields. With the retail landscape evolving rapidly, and new products and services being developed daily, businesses are finding that they need sales professionals with a unique understanding of their offering in order to sell it to clients and consumers effectively. For instance, as the demand for green technology grows, companies involved in this sector are calling for sales representatives who are familiar with all the intricacies of renewable energy products, like solar panels, so they can spell out the benefits of them to potential customers and business partners.

4. Data Protection and Privacy Officers

New regulations that govern how businesses collect, store, and use consumers’ personal information are encouraging companies to recruit professionals who can help them comply with these requirements. The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), for example, might only apply in EU member states, but it’s impacting all businesses that offer services to EU-based citizens. Consequently, even enterprises in the U.S. are recognizing the need to hire someone who can assist with implementing processes that will ensure they remain on the right side of the law. In addition to data protection professionals focused on consumer privacy, companies will also increasingly be looking to hire information security analysts to help them safeguard their own networks and systems against the growing threat of cyberattacks. 

5. Health Practitioners

Needless to say, we’re likely always going to need the services of healthcare providers, but the demand for these professionals is projected to grow quite substantially over the next few years for one key reason: the Baby Boomers are starting to reach the age when health becomes more of a concern, and because the size of this generation is so large, there’s naturally a need for more health practitioners to care for them all. More specifically, it’s predicted that those working as home health aides, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, medical assistants, and physical therapists will be especially sought after in the future—all of these promising 2019 jobs are included on the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics’ list of the 20 occupations that are expected to grow the fastest between 2016 and 2026.

6. Regulatory Agents and Compliance Attorneys

As more businesses head into uncharted territory and experiment with products and services that rely on AI and other cutting-edge technologies, they’ll no doubt be looking to bring in professionals who can guide them with regards to legalities and ensure they’re abiding by industry rules. A compliance attorney, for instance, will assist a company by managing risks, developing corporate policies, and anticipating legal issues that may arise down the line. By doing so, they create room for innovation while warding off potential trouble. The hiring increases in this field can also be attributed to the fact that organizations across many sectors are being pushed to adapt to new, ever-evolving government regulations, and they’re battling to do so without the help of expert counsel.

7. Workers in the Renewable Energy Sector

Thanks to the (increasingly loud) call for sustainable sources of power, many of the 2019 jobs that have excellent employment prospects fall within the renewable energy sector. Along with energy engineers, wind turbine technicians and PV solar panel installersshould have no problem finding work in future—in fact, these are two of the fastest growing occupations in the U.S., with the first expected to grow by 96 percent between 2016 and 2026 and the latter by an impressive 105 percent (according to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook). While these professions initially saw boosts predominantly in California, they’ve grown in popularity throughout the U.S. as more states recognize the importance of adopting green technologies.  

 

Read more

Feature | 08/12/2016

Common Resume Mistakes

It's easy to rely on Spellcheck, but you might be surprised by how many grammatical and spelling mistakes it can miss.

Feature | 08/12/2016

Water Scarcity and Growth Prospects

Julia Devlin, a former lecturer in the Economics department at UVA and now a senior fellow at the Brookings Institute, looks at the relationship between water scarcity and economic growth in the Middle East and Africa. Her article can be found at the Brookings Institute.

Feature | 09/12/2016

ECO NEWSLETTER 9.12.16

Updates from the ECO with Jobs, Events, and Workshops!

Feature | 08/21/2016

ECO Newsletter 8.21.16

 Job and Internship Search Basics Pre-reqisite Workshop Sign-up is Open!

Feature | 05/04/2017

16th CEPR Postgraduate conference at Nottingham

Devaki Ghose presents her paper "Identifying the Role of Vertical Linkage in Agglomeration: Empirical Evidence from India" on Thursday, May 4th, 2017 in University of Nottingham, UK.

Feature | 08/12/2016

What Percent of Interns Receive Full-Time Offers?

Vault recently released its Top Internship Rankings for 2016. These included a prestige ranking, an overall best internship ranking, a best internship for quality of life ranking, and several rankings by industy. The rankings were created from the results from our annual internship survey, which asked nearly 6,000 current and former interns to rate their internships, as well as their dream internship employers, in various categories.

In addition, the survey asked interns to tell us if they received or expected to receive a full-time offer at the end of their internship from their internship employer and, if so, if they were going to accept that offer (note: the survey was administered at the end of this past summer, when some interns were still interning).

(You may need to login into HandShake to access this article).

Feature | 06/11/2014

The Secret Life of Ken Elzinga

"Professor Ken Elzinga would kill to teach you economics. On paper, at least. The revered U.Va. professor—who has taught more than 40,000  U.Va. students since 1967—has all the while been penning murder mysteries on the side, under the pen name Marshall Jevons, with a protagonist who solves crime using economic theory..." (Michelle Koidin Jaffee) 

Read the full story here.

Feature | 09/19/2016

ECO NEWSLETTER 9.19.16

This week's newsletter is loaded with opportunities for economics majors, curated specifically for you!

Feature | 11/20/2018

Alumni Spotlight: Joy Fan

Alumni Spotlight: JOY FAN, Media Relations & Marketing Associate at the American Enterprise Institute 

 

Life at UVA and since graduating: 

Joy graduated from the University of Virginia in 2017 with degrees in Economics and Art History. While at UVA, Joy was the president of the Rhapsody Ballet Ensemble while she pursued her personal interests in business and art. Some of her favorite economics courses were Money and Banking and Environmental Economics, although she enjoyed several public policy-focused economics courses.

 

She currently works at the American Enterprise Institute. She serves as the liaison between the press and over 30 AEI scholars in economic, financial services, tech, and healthcare policy.

 

What are your job’s responsibilities?

  • 35% is pitching to reporters–sending research to print and broadcast reporters
  • 35% fielding media requests (connecting scholars to media)
  • 30% staffing media crews and events, updating media contact database, tracking press interactions for analysis later

 

Joy’s tips for students:

  • Reach out to alumni–they always have good insights to share if not more help
  • Don’t forget your resume and cover letter serve as writing samples 
  • Get as much writing experience as possible. Almost every job requires good writing skills, whether it be in the form of a report or memo, or even just as communication between colleagues.

Feature | 09/05/2016

ECO NEWSLETTER 9.5.16

Awesome events and job postings for econ majors! This week's prep programs for Career Fairs!

Feature | 10/26/2017

3 TIPS FOR STUDENTS FROM D.J. D-SOL

"In a recent Exchanges at Goldman Sachs podcast, Goldman president and co-COO David Solomon offers some rather helpful advice for college students. Solomon, who in addition to his Goldman duties spins music in Miami and the Bahamas under the stage name D.J. D-Sol, went to Hamilton College, a small liberal arts college in Clinton, N.Y., about a four-hour drive from New York City. D-Sol culled much of the following advice from his fond four years at Hamilton, as well as from his three decades in investment banking (and perhaps a bit from his late nights on the decks)." -Derek Loosvelt 

 

Click here to read the rest of the article

Feature | 11/01/2018

Cailin Slattery Presents at 74th Congress of the International Institute of Public Finance

Cailin Slattery presented two papers at the recent International Institute of Public Finance (IIPF) conference in Tampere, Finland; "Campaign Spending and Corporate Subsidies: Evidence from Citizens United v FEC" and "U.S. State Incentive Spending and Large Establishment Spillovers." Both papers use a new data set that she created on state incentive spending, and are closely related to her job market paper on how states compete for firms using discretionary subsidies. She received valuable feedback on her papers and discussed her research with Public Finance scholars from all over the world, including recent UVa grad Elliott Isaac, who is now an assistant professor at Tulane University. The conference was not only filled with research sessions, but included a walking tour along the Pyynikki Ridge,  the world's highest gravel ridge, which was formed by sediment accumulating between two glaciers.

 

Feature | 09/20/2016

ARTICLE - ALUM’S APP ASPIRES TO BECOME ‘THE AMAZON OF HEALTH CARE’ IN ASIA

"University of Virginia graduate Dato' Chevy Beh envisions his startup, BookDoc, transforming health care in Asia just as tech behemoth Amazon has transformed retail around the world.

BookDoc, which Beh founded in Malaysia in 2015, offers a free mobile app and online platform to help patients quickly identify, and get an appointment with, nearby health care providers. The concept was inspired by a good friend who called Beh for help after contracting dengue fever in Malaysia and struggling to find a doctor who could treat him quickly" -Caroline Newman

 

Click here to read the rest of the article.

Feature | 08/24/2018

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Feature | 09/09/2018

Register for Princeton Fintech and Quant Conference

We are pleased to invite you to the 2018 IIT Stuart - Princeton Fintech and Quant Conference at IIT Stuart School of Business in Downtown Chicago, IL. The conference will feature speakers and panelists from leading trading firms, banks, and hedge funds from around the country, as well as from financial technology firms and startups. Our speakers will provide real fintech and quant insights from the trenches. There will be opportunities to network with leading professionals and fellow top students and gain an insider's view of this fast-paced and exciting sector of finance and technology as well as learn about internship and employment opportunities.

The biggest trend right now in the Fintech space is blockchain technology. While Database and Networking technologies have evolved separately over the years, blockchain is at the intersection of these technologies and it enables systems that maintain a single version of data across a network using consensus algorithms. These consensus algorithms are based on cryptography concepts. This year's conference will feature speakers from this space as well as educational talks and workshops.
 

Over the past seven years, we’ve brought together more than 120 high-level industry professionals and 2,500 students in Princeton and in Chicago to discuss the leading trends in quantitative trading. This year’s spring conference will take place on Saturday, October 20th, at the IIT Stuart School of Business in Downtown Chicago, IL. Below are just a few of the companies that have been represented and recruited at previous conferences:

  • Deutsche Bank
  • JP Morgan
  • Two Sigma
  • Princeton Alpha
  • Ripple
  • AQR
  • Quantopian
  • Domeyard LLP
  • Portfolio Effect
  • Byte Academy
  • Cindicator
  • Numerix
  • And many more!

    Students and Young Alumni who purchase tickets by Sunday, September 9th will receive 15% off the Early Tickets registration price by including the promotional code ALPHA15. To qualify, students must use their .edu email for registration.

To register, please visit our conference site: 

http://www.princetonfintechquant.org/

or our Eventbrite page: 

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/princeton-fintech-quant-conference-fall-2018-chicago-tickets-46348508637

We look forward to having you join us.

Feature | 06/24/2016

Prof. James Harrigan on the Brexit

Professor Harrigan shared his thoughts on Brexit, on a live interview on Friday (June 24)! 

Feature | 03/08/2017

2017 Undergraduate Economics Career Forum

Economics alumni will return to Monroe Hall from around the country to share their career experiences with U.Va. students. Career panels will be moderated by Economics faculty.

Feature | 09/20/2018

Employment Possibilities Abound in This Article: Study: Netflix users are so addicted to bingeing there’s not much time left for family

By Andy Meeks

Imagine, for a moment, how much time a day you spend uninterrupted with family members. Got it? Now go ahead and double it. That, friends, is roughly how much time every single day the average Netflix user spends bingeing content.

It’s an estimate that comes via Streaming Observer, which found that the average Netflix user now spends a little more than an hour a day streaming content on the service. Which adds up to some 434 hours, the equivalent of 18 days, over the course of a year.

 

Here’s how the site arrived at those numbers. “At the end of last year, the company announced that its users streamed 140 million hours of content per day. At the time, there were 117.58 million subscribers. Simple math shows that dividing 140 million hours of content watched daily by 117.58 million subscribers results in the average user spending 1 hour and 11 minutes each day watching content on Netflix.”

One hour and 11 minutes doesn’t sound so bad, until you put it up against the roughly 36 minutes of quality, distraction-free time that other studies have found people spend with family members each day.

 

Here’s a closer look at what Streaming Observer has found:

“Recent studies have found that families only spend anywhere from 34 to 37 minutes of quality, undistracted time (e.g. time where they “feel they actually bond”) together on a typical day,” Streaming Observer notes. “Let’s average that out to 35.5. That means the typical subscriber spends about half as much quality time with their family as they do with Netflix.”

But there’s more. Again, these are all rough estimates, but according to the most recent annual edition of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ American Time Use Survey, the Streaming Observer data also shows that Netflix users generally spend a lot more time bingeing than they do exercising, reading and hanging out with friends. Combined!

The crazy thing is that even with numbers like this, and with Netflix binges eating up so much of users’ time already, the company’s CEO Reed Hastings thinks the company still doesn’t own enough of its users’ day. “We’re still a small fraction of every society’s overall viewing,” he said on a call with investors earlier this summer. “So I think there’s still room to go there.”

 

Indeed, the company is still working to grow as much and as fast as it can. During the most recent quarter, Netflix reported 130 million global subscribers, up 25 percent from 104 million in the year-ago quarter.

Per Zacks Equity Research, Netflix is hoping to add 650,000 subscribers in the U.S. and a little more than 4 million internationally in the third quarter.

 

Read more

Feature | 10/27/2016

First UVA Economics GRAD Conference

 

UVA Economics Gatherings for Researchers with Advanced Degrees (GRAD) hosted the First Economics GRAD alumni conference in September 2016.  It was a wonderful weekend, drawing alumni who graduated as far back as 1992 and those who just received their PhDs this spring. 

The conference presentations covered a wide range of topics, from Daniel Wilson’s (BA 1995) research on how star scientists choose where to live, to Devesh Raval’s (BA 2005) presentation on the influence of distance on medical provider choice.  The keynote speaker, Derek Neal (PhD 1992), gave a fantastic workshop on his new paper coauthored with Gadi Barlevy, “Allocating Effort and Talent in Professional Labor Markets.”

Following the research sessions the alumni, their guests, several UVA faculty members, and current students enjoyed a cocktail reception in the Monroe Hall courtyard and dinner on The Lawn.  Saturday was a more casual day, with many groups of alumni getting together to revisit old haunts in Charlottesville and discover all the new additions, before meeting for a picnic in the gardens and then heading over together to the Hoo’s football game.

It was a great weekend.

We hope that you will be able to join us next fall for our second conference.  If you would like to get involved or learn more about UVA Econ GRAD - please take 2 minutes to fill out our survey at www.uvaecongrad.com/get-involved, or contact us at Virginia.Econ.Grad@gmail.com.

Best,

Everett Grant (Ph.D. 2015), Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas

Bill Johnson (M.A. 2013), University of Virginia

Jeff Schafer (M.A. 2012), University of Virginia

 

                          

Feature | 10/20/2017

ARTICLE - DARING TO DECLINE: KNOWING WHEN TO SAY NO TO A JOB OFFER

by Samantha McGurgan

Congratulations—you got the offer! This is cause for a celebration! Except…why are you experiencing the sinking feeling of dread? You may feel obligated to accept the offer because you already invested so much time and effort in getting to this point, and starting over takes So. Much. Work. You might be thinking:

Is it ok if I say no?
Who says no in this economy?
How do I even determine if it’s not right for me?

As someone who has said no to few offers over the years, I understand how uncomfortable and scary it is to say no to a perfectly good offer on paper. And I can also attest to the fact that I have never regretted saying no to job that didn’t feel right, and only have regretted saying yes. Here are a few questions to ponder through this decision-making process:

1.) How does your body feel? Stop analyzing, over-thinking, second-guessing, and Googling for the answer. Check in with your body: what is your gut telling you? Listen to it. Unapologetically. It’s never wrong. It’s normal to have a bit of nerves when facing a new challenge or embarking on new territory. But there’s a difference between distress (unhealthy) and eustress (healthy). Get to know how your body reacts to negative and positive stress by reflecting on the last time you experienced something of each type—how did it feel? How do those two experiences compare?

For me, I feel depleted, tired, and unconsciously withdraw when experiencing distress. I clench my teeth. Deep down I know it’s not right, but I run over it repeatedly in my mind trying to find a way to make it work. My husband says: You just got an offer—why aren’t we celebrating?

Conversely, I feel charged up, energetic, and motivated when faced with the possibility of a new and exciting challenge (aka a job I actually want). I feel inspired. I literally jump for joy after getting the call that I’ve been selected as the top candidate. I feel like everything was worth it after all.

Bottom line: If the offer doesn’t make you feel good, this is a warning sign. It’s worth it to wait for the job that won’t make you want to quit after three months.

2.) Are you running toward the finish line or being chased by wolves? Both of these instances involve quick, forward momentum. The difference lies within the motivation. My first question is always: Do you want the job or are you afraid that it’s your only option?

There are currently more job openings in the United States than people who are unemployed. The culture of scarcity that has been drilled into us since the Great Recession doesn’t reflect the reality of the job market. Given that you are qualified for the role you are seeking, wait for the job that will provide a sustainable opportunity for career growth, rather than accept the first one that comes along (if it’s not truly what you want).

Many of my graduating seniors who are in the midst of their first job plan on accepting a position as a safety net with the intent to keep looking for a better option. I ask them to think deeply about what is lacking in the opportunity, decline the offer, and seek one that is a better fit.

This doesn’t mean don’t accept an entry-level position. This means don’t settle for something okay when you could have something even better if you’d only waited another month or two. Or six. And don’t accept an offer with the intention to bail when something better comes up.

Bottom line: You’re going to find a job. Trust in that. And aim high. Do you really want to go through the interview process any time soon anyway? If you’re already planning to quit before a year or two, decline the offer.

3.) What do you want your life to look like?

If you’re like me, you’ve found yourself lying awake at night asking the Internet for a glimmer of hope or a strategy to make a non-ideal offer work with my life.

Ok Google: Is there a way to spend a two-hour commute that won’t make me angry and hateful?

I’m exaggerating, but the answer is no. For me. Because I have a family, and I know the excitement of a new role would quickly wear off after spending 12 hours each day away from home. Other people I’ve spoken to don’t mind their commute at all because they love their job so much. The question to ponder is, how will this job affect the rest of my life and therefore my happiness? How does this position relate to my ultimate goal? There are going to be sacrifices. Let’s make the sacrifices worthwhile.

Bottom line: The more you know yourself and your goals, the better you can discern if the position is right within the context of your life as a whole.

Samantha McGurgan is a career counselor at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and college success adjunct at Cuesta College. Her greatest moments of joy involve expanding the career horizons of first generation students and supporting military-connected students in their transition to civilian careers. She holds an M.A. in education, with a specialization in counseling and guidance in student affairs from Cal Poly SLO, and a B.S. in human ecology from The Ohio State University.

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

 

Feature | 05/17/2016

ARTICLE- THESE ARE THE BIGGEST SKILLS THAT NEW GRADUATES LACK

"Managers and employees don’t always see eye to eye. Fast Companyuncovered a wide gap in the way each group thinks about business cultureand their radically different ideas about work-life balance."-Lydia Dishman

Click here to read the rest of the article

Feature | 08/12/2016

How to Ace your Graduate School Interview

Graduate school interviews can be a nerve wracking process. Learn how to impress from this helpful article.

Feature | 09/26/2017

JOB INTERVIEW BASICS: PREPARE WELL TO PRESENT WELL

"You put together a solid resume and cover letter, and you’ve just been called in for an interview. If you’re like most job seekers, you may be thinking you’ll just throw on a decent outfit that morning, show up on time, and wing it. That’s fine, if your goal is to be like most job seekers. If you’d prefer to stand out from the crowd, read on."

Click here to read the rest of the article. 

Feature | 08/12/2016

What Color Is Your Parachute?

Article on: Are You a Parachute Counselor, by Dick Bolles 

This article captures the essence of the book and students may want to read it independently, or follow up by checking out the book in its entirety.

Feature | 06/05/2018

How to Include Volunteer Experience on Your Resume

When it comes to writing or updating your resume, you know you should include your relevant work history, education, and technical skills.

But what about your volunteer experience? Will hiring managers even care about the time you spent building homes in Central America or organizing that charity walk? 

I’ll make this one easy for you: yes!

You should absolutely include volunteer experience on your resume. It’ll help you 

Feature | 04/03/2018

UVA economist Adam Leive examines the health consequences of Olympic success

Feature | 01/16/2017

Thoughts on the 2017 US Economy: Prof. Ed Burton & Prof. Richard Evans (Darden)

Thoughts on the 2017 Economy from ECON Prof. Ed Burton (ECON 4340 & 4370), and UVA Darden School of Business Prof. Richard Evans.

Photo credit: Dan Addison, University Communications

Feature | 08/04/2016

Quartet Promotes Financial Inclusion

A quartet of UVA economists team up to promote financial inclusion- read more here.

Feature | 11/01/2018

Cailin Slattery Presents at Urban Economics Association Meeting

Cailin Slattery presented her job market paper "Bidding for Firms: Subsidy Competition in the U.S." at the Urban Economics Association Meeting at Columbia University in New York City. She received valuable feedback on her paper and discussed her research with Urban Economists from all over the world. She also had the opportunity to attend talks by Ed Glaeser, Raj Chetty, and recent Nobel Laureate Paul Romer.

Feature | 06/17/2015

Dowry Killings in India

"As monsoon season arrives in India, the nation’s meteorological department has warned citizens to expect lower rainfall levels for the second year in a row, on the heels of one of the deadliest heat waves in history. The predicted drought could prove dangerous not only for India’s economy but also, according to one University of Virginia economist, for its female population.

Examining the effects of climate change in India, Sheetal Sekhri, an assistant professor of economics, found that decreases in rainfall are correlated with increases in domestic violence and with dowry killings, in which a husband (and his family) kills his wife so that he can remarry and obtain new dowry payments.

According to Sekhri’s study, one standard deviation decrease from long-term average rainfall correlates with approximately an 8 percent increase in dowry killings in the affected region." (Caroline Newman)

See the full article here.

Feature | 11/10/2017

Kerem Cosar contributes to "stunningly original paper"

Feature | 01/31/2017

ECO NEWSLETTER 1.31.17

Networking Programs! New Job Postings! Economics Career Forum!

Feature | 08/12/2016

From the ECO: Networking Tips

How to plan your networking strategy.

Feature | 10/30/2018

Identify Your Network: Who do you Know?

Identify your Network: Whom do you Know?

Miriam Salpeter

A common complaint job seekers make is, “I don’t have a network!” It’s very frustrating to realize job search networking is the best way to land an opportunity but to believe that avenue isn’t open to you. Luckily, you do have a network! In fact, anyone who knows one person has a network, and it’s likely your acquaintances, friends, and family members number many more than one. In other words, it’s just a matter of learning how to identify people most interested in your expertise.

Identify Your Network

Social Media

Do you use Facebook? Are you connected to anyone on that social network? Your “friends” there, whether you really like them or not, are part of your professional network. (Even if you’ve never exchanged a word you’d consider “professional” with any of them.)

Do you use other networks, such as Instagram, Pinterest, or SnapChat? Believe it or not, people whose photos you comment on or whose pins you share are also part of your network.

You don’t need to have 500+ LinkedIn contacts to call yourself networked. However, you do need to learn how to tap into these networks of people to access professionally useful information. Ideally, you’ll want to identify any of the people in these networks who may also leverage any of the more typically accessed professional networks, such as LinkedIn, and then connect with them there.

People You Know

Maybe you don’t use social media (although it’s nearly a job-search necessity these days). “Ah ha,” you’re thinking, “I really don't have a network.” Perhaps, if you’ve never taken a class, had a job or internship, or left your house, you may make an argument that you don't have a network. However, most readers won’t accurately fit into those parameters. You have the potential to grow your network every time you leave your home. Do you grocery shop? Attend sporting events? Go to family dinners? Belong to a walking group in your neighborhood? All of these places provide great opportunities to expand your professional network.

Do you see a pattern here? Your professional network doesn’t come with special stickers or labels that say “job networking.” Your network encompasses everyone you know, and everyone those people know, too. If you really want to be fancy, it technically includes at least one more degree of separation, which would capture everyone who is a friend or acquaintance of those friends.

Start thinking about the strength of your professional network using this list:

  • Your family members and friends. (They don’t need to have jobs to join your network.)
  • Everyone you’ve ever worked with, including volunteer jobs.
  • People who attended school with you. Teachers count, too. This includes elementary school through college and grad school. Don’t forget to include people you met at professional development classes or fitness and exercise classes.
  • People you know from religious groups. If you go to religious services, everyone you meet there can be part of your network.
  • People you meet in your community or neighborhood, including at the dog park, kids’ soccer games, or the local street festival.
  • Anyone you know via your children’s activities.
  • People you meet while practicing your hobby, whether it is gardening, golfing, or skydiving. Anyone you meet can be part of your network.
  • Military contacts.
  • Your hairdresser or barber, the bartender at the local watering hole, and your dry cleaner are all in your network. Professionals who interact with a lot of people on a daily basis make great networking contacts. In addition, any one in a profession involving dealing with other professionals, such as accountants, lawyers, and business coaches make good contacts. They know a lot of people, and probably have someone in their network to connect with you.

If you don’t believe your extended network can help you get a job, these stories may change your mind.

Bettina Smalley recalled how she landed her first job out of college: “Divine intervention got me my first job at Scientific-Atlanta many moons ago. The pastor of my little Lutheran church was friends with a recruiter who needed to fill a sales position ‘at some big company’ with someone who spoke German. My pastor called me at 10 p.m. one night to tell me about it. By the end of the week, I had the job. If you're referred by a man of God, I guess they assume your references are good!”

This is a perfect example of the “you never know” factor when it comes to a job search. Bettina’s pastor knew something personal about her that also related to her professional potential: she speaks German. Are people in your network clued into your special skills and goals? One way to make sure they are in the loop about your plans and skills is to share information related to your professional life on more personal networks, such as Facebook. Do your grade school or high school friends and contacts know you’ve returned to school to study human resources, or that you just obtained certification as a massage therapist? If not, it’s a good idea to make sure they do. Either spread the word in person or via online networks to ensure you tap your network efficiently.

Andrea Clement, a PR and media professional in the medical recruiting industry,

found her current job after running into a former boss at Nordstrom on Christmas Eve. She explained, “We both scrambled to do last-minute holiday shopping. At the time I was happily employed and he had just started his own firm. He asked if I was interested and I said that I really loved my job so I wasn't sure, which was true. After the holidays, my then boss resigned, and she was my favorite aspect of that job. That February, I became the first employee of the start-up firm working for the former boss I'd seen in Nordstrom! That was 2007. I'm still here and now we have 80+ associates!”

While not every networking success story begins with a random meeting, if you ask people you know, you may be surprised to find out how many found their jobs, not just via networking, but through very random networking circumstances. The lesson in this case is that you never know when you’ll run into someone who can be influential to your career. Keep this in mind if you’re in full-on networking mode. For example, be sure you go out dressed to meet professional contacts. This doesn’t mean donning a three-piece suit to go to the bank, but consider your networking goals when you’re out and about and tweak your appearance to ensure you are comfortable introducing yourself to people no matter the circumstances.

Levels of Networks

Your network has multiple levels. Your immediate network includes the people you know directly, either in person or via social networks. You also can access the people they know as part of your extended network. In other words, your brother’s boss, your neighbor’s professor, or your college friend’s accountant, are all in your network. Don’t forget: each network links you to another network of potentially untapped contacts.

You never know when “someone will know someone.” Corey-Jan Albert, a writer and marketing consultant, shared a great networking connection story about her son, Cameron, a recent college graduate seeking a journalism position: “About a week ago, he mentioned a position he applied for. I asked him if he knew who he'd be working for there, and he said he did. I told him to check the guy's LinkedIn and see what he could find. He called me back and said, ‘YOU know someone who knows him! I can't see who that is since I'm two degrees of contact removed, but you can.’ It turns out the common connection was Cameron's 5th grade soccer coach—now living in NY, working at Reuters. Cameron reached out to him. The former soccer coach was thrilled to hear from him, and not only gave him some Intel on the situation at hand; he also offered to link him up with the editor at Reuters in charge of freelance assignments. Double win!”

This story proves a few important lessons about networking. You may find the best networking contacts are people who would never have considered members of your official network. (Most college graduates don’t think their 5th-grade soccer coach will be a key player in their job search efforts. It’s also a good reminder to tap into family member networks.) Especially if you believe your network is small, connect with relatives on LinkedIn. It’s perfectly acceptable (and expected) to “link in” with your parents, grandparents, and their friends. If Cameron hadn’t been linked to his mom, he would not have realized this terrific contact. Unexpected results may happen from networking. In this case, Cameron accessed a freelance contact, even though he is seeking a traditional, full-time job. You never know what surprises await when you explore your networking potential.

Miriam Salpeter is owner and founder of Keppie Careers (http://www.keppiecareers.com/), a coaching and consulting firm helping job seekers and entrepreneurs leverage social media and other tools to achieve their goals. She has appeared on CNN, and  major media outlets, including The Wall Street JournalThe New York TimesForbes and others have quoted her advice. In addition to her own blog, Miriam writes for U.S. News & World Report and for AolJobs.com. She is the author of the books, Social Networking for Career SuccessSocial Networking for Business Success: How to Turn Your Interests into Income, and  100 Conversations for Career Success. Named to CNN’s list of “top 10 job tweeters you should be following” and a “top 5” influencer on Twitter for job seekers by Mashable.com. Miriam also had her blog selected as a top career resource by Forbes. A vice president for a Wall Street firm prior to earning a master’s degree from Columbia University, Miriam ran the Career Action Center at the Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University before launching her own business.

 

Feature | 12/11/2018

Ben Hamilton Finds Conference Presentations Good Preparation for Job Market

On October 6, at the 74th Midwest International Trade Conference at Vanderbilt University,  I presented my job market paper, “Learning, Externalities, and Export Dynamics,” in a 25-minute talk to an audience of economists studying international trade. In November, I presented my job market paper twice at different venues in Washington D.C.  First, at the 88th Southern Economic Association annual meeting, where I received constructive feedback on a condensed 15-minute version of my talk from students and professors of varied concentrations. Next, at the second Mid-Atlantic International Trade Workshop, hosted by the Federal Reserve Board, I gave a longer, 40-minute version of my talk and benefited from helpful comments and discussion with other trade economists.  Having the opportunity to present my talk in a variety of formats, receive questions from audiences unfamiliar with me and my work, and network with many people in my field was a valuable experience, particularly as I prepare to go on the job market during the next few months.  

Feature | 07/06/2018

PhD Candidate Emily Cook Publishes Article with Professors Ciliberto (UVA) and Williams (UNC)

UVA Professor Federico Ciliberto, UVA PhD Candidate Emily E. Cook, and UVA alumnus and current UNC Professor Jonathan W. Williams recently published “Network Structure and Consolidation in the U.S. Airline Industry, 1990-2015” in the Review of Industrial Organization. The authors study the effect of consolidation on airline network connectivity using three measures of centrality from graph theory: Degree; Closeness; and Betweenness. Degree is the fraction of all possible links that are actually served by at least one airline out of an airport; Closeness is the inverse of the average distance (i.e., number of links) from an airport to every other airport; and Betweenness is the frequency with which an airport is found to be on the shortest path between two other airports.

Changes in these measures from 1990 to 2015 imply: i) the average airport services a greater proportion of possible routes; ii) the average origin airport is fewer stops away from any given destination; and iii) the average hub is less often along the shortest route between two other airports. Yet, the authors find the trend toward greater connectivity in the national network structure is largely unaffected by consolidation—in the form of mergers and codeshare agreements—during this period. Forty years after its deregulation, the airline industry continues to be the focus of research, antitrust cases, and public policy debates. In this paper the authors contribute to the evolving debate by examining how mergers and alliances have shaped the entire industry’s U.S. network.

The figure above, which captures trends in the network measures from 1990 to 2015, shows the year fixed effects and associated confidence intervals from separate OLS regressions of standardized Degree, Closeness, and Betweenness on a constant along with year, month, and airport fixed effects.

These maps show the average Betweenness by airport by year for years 1990, 2000, 2010, and 2015. Darker shading and larger size correspond to airport locations with a higher Betweenness measure in that year. The Betweenness measure captures hubbing behavior well, and separates major hubs from non-hubs. By this measure, Chicago O’Hare (ORD) was the most important hub in 1990, but by 2000 Atlanta (ATL) had overtaken Chicago. By 2010, Cincinnati (CVG) and St. Louis (STL) had stopped functioning as hubs, and by 2015, Charlotte (CLT) became a significant hub.

 

 

Feature | 04/10/2017

Using Twitter to track the FX Market

See Professor Van Wincoop and Vahid Gholampour's research here: http://www.people.virginia.edu/~ev4n/papers/twitter_Feb_27a.pdf

"Traders need look no further than their Twitter feeds to gain an edge in currency markets, according to a new study by a pair of academics.

Buying and selling the euro based on predictions tweeted by currency watchers would give you risk-adjusted returns almost four times bigger than standard carry-trade strategies, Vahid Gholampour and Eric van Wincoop found in a paper published last month." - Bloomberg, Liam Vaughan

Feature | 08/25/2017

Profs. Holt and Shobe: New design ideas for RGGI

"In a new independent report posted today by Resources for the Future (RFF)-Expanding the Toolkit: The Potential Role for an Emissions Containment Reserve in RGGI -RFF's Dallas Burtraw, Karen Palmer, and Anthony Paul, with the University of Virginia's Charles Holt and William Shobe, use simulation modeling and laboratory experiments to assess this potential new design idea for RGGI."

Feature | 08/07/2017

ARTICLE - WHAT IS 'GRIT' AND WHY DO EMPLOYERS WANT YOU TO HAVE IT?

"Every year, Vault surveys thousands of investment banking professionals, asking them to tell us about life at their firms. We ask about culture, compensation, hours, training, and many more areas, including the hiring process. With respect to the hiring process, we ask professionals which traits an ideal job candidate needs to have to get hired. In the past, and again this year, banking professionals told us that the following traits are highly important (and, in some cases, required): a strong work ethic, team-playing ability, strong communication skills, strong technical skills, superior intellect, excellent problem-solving skills, and the ability to adapt to different situations." -Derek Loosvelt 

Click here to read the rest of the article. 

Feature | 09/29/2016

Dropping application fees for low-income students

A 2013 report by Professor Sarah Turner and Professor Caroline Hoxby of Stanford University, has helped inspire colleges to drop application fees for low-income students.

See their research here.

Feature | 12/22/2016

ARTICLE-THINGS YOU SHOULD REMOVE FROM YOUR RESUME IMMEDIATELY

"Hiring managers rarely have the time or resources to look at each résumé closely, and they typically spend about six seconds on their initial fit/no fit decision. If you want to pass that test, you need to have some solid qualifications — and the perfect resume to highlight them."-Tayyiba Iram

Click here to read the rest of the article

Feature | 06/21/2017

ARTICLE- END YOUR INTERVIEW ON A HIGH NOTE WITH THIS QUESTION

"One of your top priorities as a job candidate should be to end your interview with a power punch – something that’ll make you stand out and show your enthusiasm. Unfortunately, sometimes that’s hard to do, especially when so many interviews end with you blandly telling your interviewer that you’ve got no more questions left for him to answer.

So, here’s a question you can ask to conclude your interview on a high-note and show that you’re still as hungry as ever for the job: “Would you mind showing me around the office before I head out? I would love the chance to see the place I might be working at soon.”

Here’s why it works!" -Peter Yang 

 

Click here to read the rest of the article

Feature | 12/12/2018

A One Stop Shop For All Things Diversity Recruiting - The Most Exhaustive List On WSO

Diversity Investment Bank Programs

The opportunities are separated into two buckets: introductory programs and internship opportunities.

Introductory programs are 1-3 day programs where candidates are invited to the firm (transportation and lodging expenses covered by the firm) for presentations, workshops, and networking events.Introductory programs are designed to get you in front of professionals and human resources, and, if done properly, they will get you in the pipeline for internship opportunities the following year (in my experience, accelerated interviews have been the result of this). The key here is to dress sharp and make a concerted effort to leave a good impression. Ask questions when the opportunity arises, brush up on the firm / recent news for speaking points, ask for business cards of the people you speak with, and FOLLOW UP (cannot emphasis this part enough). These programs are an opportunity for you to make connections with people that will resources during the recruiting process, so it is imperative that send thank you emails after the events and keep in touch with these people from time-to-time.

The second bucket is internship opportunities. These opportunities are in the format of either:

  • An introduction with a superday attached (e.g. JP Morgan Launching Leaders)
  • a diversity-specific internship application drop and process

Keep in mind, with these programs you can also submit a general summer application as well, so I highly encourage you to double down and submit a diversity program application and a general application where applicable (e.g. Goldman Sachs Insights Day + Goldman Sachs general internship application for sophomores, Credit Suisse America CEO Awards Program + Credit Suisse general application for juniors).

IBank Diversity Scholarship Opportunities

Additionally, some firms offer scholarships as a component of their diversity recruiting efforts, not all scholarships include an interview for internships as part of the process (e.g. Morgan Stanley Richard B. Fisher, Goldman Sachs Scholarship for Excellence), so make sure to submit an internship application in addition to the scholarship application to cover your bases.

Boutique Banks Diversity Programs

Most of these programs are hosted by BB firms, but boutiques are starting to organize similar events. Perella Weinberg has hosted a program for a few recruiting cycles. 2016 is the inaugural year for Lazard's and Evercore's sophomore women's programs. I aim to update this as I come across more programs.

Diversity Recruiting Talent Organizations

Lastly, I included two partner organizations: Sponsors for Educational Opportunity (SEO) and Management Leadership for Tomorrow (MLT). These are two organizations that firms partner with to secure diverse candidates. SEO gets a lot of crap on these forums, but, as with all recruiting, you get very strong candidates and some not so strong ones--you should aim to be a strong one. With SEO you can go through their process and interview with firms, or you can independently secure your own offer and join their program to receive access to their comprehensive training materials / program.

Introductory (Fly-In) Programs:

The Blackstone Group - BX Diverse Leaders Program

  • Description: 2-day program in NYC
  • Eligibility: URM, Sophomore/Junior
  • Deadline: February 15, 2016 (Every Spring)
  • Program Dates: March 10-11, 2016

The Blackstone Group - Future Women Leaders Program

  • Description: 2-day program in NYC
  • Eligibility: Sophomore Women
  • Deadline: March 1, 2016 (Every Spring)
  • Program Dates: April 14-15, 2016

BAML - Elevate Diversity Forum

  • Description: 2-day program in NYC
  • Eligibility: URM, Freshmen/Sophomores
  • Deadline: Sunday, March 27th, 2016 at 11:59pm (Every Spring)
  • Program Dates: Week of May 9, 2016

BAML - Emerging Women's Program

  • Description: 2-day program in NYC
  • Eligibility: Freshman/Sophomore Women (Every Spring)
  • Deadline: Sunday, March 27th, 2016 at 11:59pm
  • Program Dates: Week of May 9, 2016

BAML - Ignite With STEM

  • Description: 2-day program in NYC
  • Eligibility: Freshman/Sophomore STEM majors
  • Deadline: Sunday, March 27th, 2016 at 11:59pm (Every Spring)
  • Program Dates: Week of May 9, 2016

Barclays - Freshman Foundation

  • Description: 1-day program in NYC
  • Eligibility: URM/Female/LGBT/Veteran/Disability
  • Deadline: Spring 2017 (Every Spring)
  • Program Dates: March 4, 2016

Barclays - Sophomore Springboard

  • Description: 1-day program in NYC (includes mentorship program for junior year recruiting)
  • Eligibility: URM/Female
  • Deadline: March 6, 2016 (Every Spring)
  • Program Dates: April 15, 2016 (females), April 16, 2016 (ethnically diverse)

Credit Suisse - BA Explorer Program

  • Description: 2-day program in NYC
  • Eligibility: URM, Freshmen/Sophomores
  • Deadline: April 15, 2016 (Every Spring)
  • Program Dates: May 19-20, 2016

Credit Suisse - Top Talent Women's Mentor Programs

  • Description: Multi-day programs in NYC, specific programs for IBD, S&T, AM, and Technology
  • Eligibility: Female, Sophomores
  • Deadline: March 1, 2016 (Every Spring)

Evercore - Women's Sophomore Symposium

  • Description: 1 day program
  • Eligibility: Sophomore Women
  • Deadline: March 13 (Every Spring)
  • Program Dates: April 8 (Every Spring)

Goldman Sachs - Undergraduate Camp

  • Description: Multi-day programs in NYC
  • Eligibility: URM, Female, freshman
  • Deadline: Every Spring
  • Program Dates: Every Spring

Goldman Sachs - Pride Summit

  • Description: 2 day program in NYC
  • Eligibility: LGBTQ, freshman/sophomore/junior
  • Deadline: October 25 (Every Fall)
  • Program Dates: November 23-24 (Early Fall)

JP Morgan - BA Early Advantage Program

  • Description: 2-day programs in NYC, Dallas, Chicago
  • Eligibility: URM/Female/LGBT/Veteran/Disability, Freshmen/Sophomores
  • Deadline: March 6, 2016 (Every Spring)
  • Program Dates: Varies by location; NYC is late May 2016

Lazard - Sophomore Women's Event

  • Description: 1 day program
  • Eligibility: Sophomore Women
  • Deadline: March 27 (Every Spring)
  • Program Dates: April 8 (Every Spring)

Morgan Stanley - Early Insights Program

  • Description: Various 1-day firm-wide programs in NYC
  • Eligibility: URM/Female/LGBT/Veteran, Freshmen/Sophomores/Juniors (varies by program)
  • Deadline: Varies by program (Winter/Spring)
  • Program Dates: Varies by program

Perella Weinburg Partners - Women's Advisory Prep Program

  • Description: 2-day program in NYC (pipeline for accelerated junior SA position)
  • Eligibility: Sophomore Women
  • Deadline: March 13, 2016 at 11:50pm (Every Spring)
  • Program Dates: April 7-8, 2016

Wells Fargo - (Various Programs)

  • Description: Multi-day programs in NYC/Charlotte
  • Eligibility: URM/Female/LGBT/Veteran/Disability, Freshmen/Sophomores/Juniors
  • Deadline: Varies

Summer Internships - High School Senior

J.P Morgan - 2015 CIB Summer High School Program

  • Description: 3-week summer rotational internship program in NYC
  • Divisions: Sales and Trading and Investment Banking rotations
  • Eligibility: URM, must attend a New York Metro area high school or have a permanent residence in New York Metro area
  • Deadline: spring 2015

J.P Morgan - Smart Starts Scholarship Program

  • Description: 4 year full-tuition scholarship and 4 years of internships (full-time during summers; part-time during school year)
  • Divisions: Sales and Trading, Investment Banking
  • Eligibility: URM, must attend a New York Metro area high school student, attend a participating college
  • Deadline: Every Winter

Summer Internships - Freshman

Morgan Stanley - Freshman Enhancement Program

  • Description: 10-week freshman summer analyst program in NYC
  • Divisions: Sales and Trading, Investment Banking, Global Capital Markets
  • Eligibility: URM
  • Deadline: varies (fall / winter / early spring)

Summer Internships - Sophomore

BAML - GBAM Sophomore Summer Program

  • Description: sophomore summer analyst program
  • Divisions: Investment Banking and Global Capital Markets
  • Eligibility: URM, Women
  • Deadline: Every Fall

BAML - GBAM Sophomore Summer Rotational Program

  • Description: sophomore summer analyst program
  • Divisions: Sales and Trading
  • Eligibility: URM, Women
  • Deadline: Every Fall

BAML - Global Banking & Markets Scholarship Of Distinction

  • Description: scholarship of $5,000 for sophomores
  • Divisions: GBAM
  • Eligibility: URM/Women/LGBTQ/Veterans sophomores/juniors
  • Deadline: Every Fall

Barclays - Sophomore Skills

  • Description: 2 day program with interviews for sophomore summer analyst program in NYC
  • Divisions: Sales and Trading, Investment Banking
  • Eligibility: URM, Women, LGBTQ
  • Deadline: November 22, 2015 (Every Fall)
  • Program Date: January 7-8, 2016

Citigroup Diversity - Sophomore Leadership Program

  • Description: sophomore summer analyst rotational program
  • Divisions: Sales and Trading, Investment Banking
  • Eligibility: URM
  • Deadline: Every Fall

Credit Suisse - Steps To Success / Doug Paul Program

  • Description: sophomore summer analyst program in NYC, scholarship of $5,000
  • Divisions: Investment Banking, Sales and Trading, Asset Management, Equity Research
  • Eligibility: URM, Sophomores
  • Deadline: November 2015 (Every Fall)

Deutsche Bank - DB Achieve Program

  • Description: sophomore summer analyst program in NYC (SF as well for IB)
  • Divisions: Investment Banking, Markets, Asset & Wealth Management
  • Eligibility: URM, Women, Sophomores
  • Deadline: November 2015 (Every Fall)

Goldman Sachs - Insights Day, Securities Insight Day, Diverse Abilities Insight Day, LGBTQ Insight Day

  • Description: 2 day program with interview for sophomore/junior SA programs
  • Divisions: IBD, IMD, S&T
  • Eligibility: URM/LBBTQ/Women/Diverse Abilities, sophomore/juniors
  • Deadline: August/September
  • Program Dates: Varies, Early Fall

Goldman Sachs - Summer Analyst Program

  • Description: general summer analyst program
  • Divisions: IBD, S&T
  • Eligibility: URM, women, sophomores
  • Deadline: Every Fall

J.P. Morgan - CIB Launching Leaders Program

  • Description: 2 day program with interview for 10-week sophomore summer analyst program in NYC; $5,00 scholarship (additional $7,500 if you return for junior year, $2,500 if you return full-time)
  • Divisions: IBD, Investor Services, Public Finance, Research, S&T, Treasury Services, Risk
  • Eligibility: URM, sophomore/juniors
  • Deadline: September 30, 2015 (Every Fall)
  • Program Dates: October 29-30, 2015 (Every Fall)

J.P. Morgan - Asset Management BA Launching Leaders

  • Description: 2 day program with interview for 10-week sophomore summer analyst program in NYC, $5,00 scholarship (additional $7,500 if you return for junior year, $2,500 if you return full-time)
  • Divisions: Global Wealth Management, Global Investment Management
  • Eligibility: URM, sophomore/juniors
  • Deadline: October 11, 2015 (Every Fall)
  • Program Dates: November 13, 2015 (Every Fall)

Morgan Stanley - Sophomore Summer Analyst Programs

  • Description: 10-week sophomore summer analyst programs in NYC
  • Divisions: Sales and Trading, Investment Banking, Global Capital Markets, Investment Mgmt.
  • Eligibility: URM, sophomores
  • Deadline: varies (Every Fall)

Morgan Stanley - Richard B. Fisher Scholarship Program

  • Description: Scholarship of up to $15,000; to be considered candidates must fill out summer analyst application in addition to RBF scholarship application)
  • Eligibility: URM
  • Deadline: varies (Every Fall)

UBS - Sophomore Women's Program (CCS)

  • Description: 8-week sophomore summer analyst programs in NYC
  • Divisions: Coverage and Advisory (IBD) and Capital Markets Solution
  • Eligibility: Sophomore Women
  • Deadline: January 3, 2016

Wells Fargo - Sophomore Conferences (Various)

  • Description: conferences in NR that include interviews for summer programs
  • Divisions: various
  • Eligibility: URM, Women, LGBTQ
  • Deadline: Every Fall
  • Program Every Spring

Summer Internships - Junior

BAML - Global Banking & Markets Scholarship Of Distinction

  • Description: scholarship of $10,000 for juniors, must complete formal internship application in addition to scholarship application
  • Divisions: GBAM
  • Eligibility: URM/Women/LGBTQ/Veterans, sophomores/juniors
  • Deadline: Every Fall

Barclays - Junior Success Program

  • Description: 2 day program with interview for summer analyst program; opportunity to be considered for $10,000 Inspiring Excellence Scholarship
  • Divisions: Investment Banking, Research, Markets
  • Eligibility: URM/Female/LGBTQ
  • Deadline: Early Fall 2016
  • Program Dates: November 5-6 (Banking), November 3-4 (Markets and Research)

Credit Suisse - Americas CEO Awards Scholarship

  • Description: Summer analyst program, scholarship of up to $10,000
  • Divisions: Asset Management, Equities, Fixed Income, Investment Banking
  • Eligibility: URM, Juniors
  • Deadline: Fall 2016

Goldman Sachs - Insights Day, Securities Insight Day, Diverse Abilities Insight Day, LGBTQ Insight Day

  • Description: Summer analyst program, scholarship of up to $10,000
  • Divisions: Asset Management, Equities, Fixed Income, Investment Banking
  • Eligibility: URM, Juniors
  • Deadline: Fall 2016

J.P. Morgan - CIB Launching Leaders Program

  • Description: 2 day program with interview for 10-week sophomore summer analyst program in NYC; $15,000 scholarship
  • Divisions: IBD, Investor Services, Public Finance, Research, S&T, Treasury Services, Risk
  • Eligibility: URM, sophomore/juniors
  • Deadline: September 30, 2015 (Every Fall)
  • Program Dates: October 29-30, 2015 (Every Fall)

J.P. Morgan - Asset Management BA Launching Leaders

  • Description: 2 day program with interview for 10-week sophomore summer analyst program in NYC, $15,000
  • Divisions: Global Wealth Management, Global Investment Management
  • Eligibility: URM, sophomore/juniors
  • Deadline: October 11, 2015 (Every Fall)
  • Program Dates: November 13, 2015 (Every Fall)

J.P. Morgan - Winning Women Scholarship Program

  • Description: 2 day program with interview for 10-week sophomore summer analyst program in NYCand SF, $15,000
  • Divisions: ALL
  • Eligibility: Junior Women
  • Deadline: September 20, 2015 (Every Fall)
  • Program Dates: November 13, 2015 - SF, November 5-6, 2015 - NYC IBD / Treasury Services, November 19-20, 2015 - NYC Risk / Research / S&T / Public Finance / Investor Services (Every Fall)

Morgan Stanley - Richard B. Fisher Scholarship Program

  • Description: scholarship of up to $15,000, must complete a formal summer analyst application in addition to RBF application
  • Eligibility: URM/LGBT, Sophomores/Juniors
  • Deadline: Fall 2016

Partner Organizations

Sponsors For Educational Opportunity (SEO)

SEO is the premier organization firms partner with in order to order to get diverse candidates into their summer analyst programs. In addition to getting students in front of BB partners, the program providing students with mentorship, technical training, and interview prep. Great resource for students interested in front office roles, but attend a school not heavily represented on the Street. The earlier you join the SEO the more value you gain (e.g. freshman have opportunity to secure sophomore internships through SEO pipeline).

Learn more about SEO on their website.

Management Leadership For Tomorrow (MLT)

MLT is another great organization for underrepresented minorities. Unlike SEO, MLT is Corporate America focused and includes opportunities beyond financial services. I would also recommend joining MLT as early as possible.

Learn more about MLT and apply on their website.

Check Out This Other Relevant List of Diversity Recruiting Programs:
Teller's Comprehensive Guide to Diversity Recruiting

 

Read More  

Feature | 04/06/2018

ARTICLE - 25 SHORT, SWEET TIPS FOR SUCCESS AS A SUMMER INTERN

 25 SHORT, SWEET TIPS FOR SUCCESS AS A SUMMER INTERN

by Sarah Steenrod

 

While it seems like just yesterday (okay, so more like 13 years ago) I was an intern at Neiman Marcus in Las Vegas, the lessons I learned and experiences I had a during that pivotal time in my college and professional career are crystal clear. Here are some tips that will help make your internship a success:

1.      Set goals. Having personal and professional goals can help you make the most of your summer, stay on track, and know if you have achieved what you set out to do.

2.      Ask questions. An internship is a learning process and you may need to seek clarification along the way.

3.      Participate in all intern and company activities that you are invited to. It’s a great way to meet fellow interns and people at the company who are investing their time in your experience.

4.      Share your ideas. People want to know what you think, so speak up!

5.      If you finish your work, ask for more. By taking initiative, you may end up with an awesome project or learning experience.

6.      Pack your lunch. You’ll save money and calories. It’s absolutely fine to join your colleagues and treat yourself to lunch every once in a while, but you will thank yourself at the end of the summer if you don’t blow your paychecks on takeout sushi.

7.      Dress for the job you want, not the one you have. Always be sure to follow the dress code. Make sure your clothes are clean, neat, and pressed

8.      Get a good night’s rest. If you’re used to going to bed at 2 a.m., the sound of the alarm at 6 a.m. is going to be a rude awakening (literally and figuratively). No one at your workplace will care if you’re tired, so don’t look or act tired.

9.      Consider your internship a three-month interview. This is your opportunity to make the most of each day with the potential of getting a job offer at the end.

10. Ask people if you can be of help to them. You might think you don’t have a lot to offer, but perhaps one of your colleagues has a child that is considering your university and would love to hear your perspective.

11. Explore the city…and the food. If you’re in Cleveland, don’t miss the West Side Market and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. St. Louis is famous for fried ravioli. In Houston, be sure to try the BBQ.

12. Exercise. Take a brisk walk, ride a bike, run, do yoga! Do whatever you like, just get moving!

13. Drink water. That’s what the water coolers are for! Eight 8-ounce glasses day is what’s recommended, but if that sounds like a lot, just start with a couple glasses a day. It also helps to get a water bottle that you really like.

14. If you make a mistake, acknowledge it, find a way to fix it, and move on. Don’t make excuses.

15. Connect with alumni from your school. Use your university’s alumni club. Tap into the LinkedIn Find Alumni tool.

16. Check in regularly with your parents, family members, and friends and let them know how your internship is going….they will appreciate it.

17. Say please. It’s amazing how many people will be willing to help you if you ask nicely.

18. Follow all computer rules and lock your computer when you step away from your desk. Also, if your company has a social media policy, refrain from posting on Facebook during work hours.

19. Ask for feedback. Some supervisors will be good at giving you positive and constructive feedback, while others may be less forthcoming. If they know it’s important to you, they may be more likely to give it.

20. Avoid office gossip. If someone talks about others to you, they are probably talking about you to others.

21. Pay attention to your experiences, reflect on them, and jot down a few notes. Your worst on-the-job experience may someday be your best interview story. The trick is remembering all the details.

22. Wear sunscreen. Seriously

23. Be present and enjoy the experience!

24. Keep in touch. Don’t wait until you need something to e-mail your former supervisor. Send an e-mail every once in a while to check in and let them know how you’re doing.

25. Thank people and let them know how they impacted your life and career. A handwritten note is a very nice touch.

 

Sarah Steenrod is Director of Undergraduate Career Consultation and Programs in the Fisher College of Business at The Ohio State University.

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Feature | 11/08/2018

Does Your Resume Have a Perfect Sales Pitch?

Does Your Resume Have a Perfect Sales Pitch?

No matter your field, there's plenty of selling in the job search, with prospective employers as buyers for the products, which are the applicants themselves. As a result, sales skills matter, and they get a lot of attention. But they're mostly thought of as the skills you need to bring to the interview, a place where your performance is akin to a sales pitch. That perspective is far too limited, however, because knowing how to sell is critical to many other parts of the search. Nowhere is that more true than in the way you handle your resume.

That seemingly cut-and-dried piece of paper can actually be a powerful sales tool if you give it half a chance. To do that, though, you have to understand something that the best salespeople, the true pros, know, and you have to be willing to apply that knowledge to your resume. With that, your resume can really do its job. In Martin Scorsese's 2013 film "The Wolf of Wall Street," Leonardo DiCaprio, as stock-promoter Jordan Belfort, issues a similar challenge to his would-be associates in boiler-room shenanigans: "Sell me this pen!"

Editor's note: You can find the clip here. We'd embed it, but it, like much of the rest of the movie, is NSFW. 

The point of the exercise is to show them, despite the high opinions they hold of their own sales skills, that they don't really know how to sell. They make all the rookie mistakes. They talk about how wonderful the pen is. They extol its beauty. They focus on its features. 

We don't need to detail all the ways they get it wrong. We don't even need to elaborate on what it means to get it right, because getting it right comes down to one very simple principle: Start with the customer, not the pen. 

In other words, a good salesman needs to know who's buying what he wants to sell. Features are nice, but they may be completely irrelevant to a given customer. Benefits, as the word itself suggests, are things worth getting, but we don't all seek the same benefits. Before selling benefits, you need to know your prospect and the benefits that actually matter. 

That's the method – call it the "buyer-first approach" – and it's often pressed into service as a good way to manage the job interview for sales and non-sales jobs alike. In that context, it works, and it does so because it's invariably helpful to know your interviewer. 

Without that knowledge, you're liable to rattle off accomplishments and experiences that don't really matter. With it, you can target the things that do, the ones the interviewer sees as important. What is she looking for from an applicant? What is this job about? What qualities suit that job, and, it follows, what qualities should you emphasize? Which of your accomplishments translate well to this new position? Which won't matter at all? What does she want to see, and how can you make her see it in you? 

The buyer-first approach is really just a matter of learning to see things through the other party's eyes, and the interview is the most obvious use case for its implementation. After all, it's the one place you might be called on to sell an actual pen to that actual person on the other side of the desk. It happens in real life, not just in the movies. 

However, if the interview is the obvious place for the buyer-first approach, it's not the only place. In fact, the approach can be profitably applied throughout the job search. 

Take resumes, for example. You may have put a lot of effort into crafting a resume that looks great. It conveys loads of positive information in a beautifully organized and highly readable form, and that's quite an accomplishment. It's as close to perfect as can be, and it should make a wonderful impression on anyone who receives it. The world trembles in anticipation. 

Before you unleash this creature on that trembling world, take a step back. There's every chance that the document you've created, beautiful though it may be, is a document that, first and foremost, looks good to you. That's to be expected, but now it's time to apply the buyer-first approach. It's time to look at it through the eyes of the people who'll be on the receiving end.

First of all, those people are not all the same. Even in the same industry, or in the same field within that industry, different companies and different jobs call for different qualities. Sometimes, those qualities are spelled out in a job posting, and the applicant needs to simply hit the marks explicitly laid out. At other times, you have to dig deeper to find what's on a hiring manager's mind. You have to interpret what the "buyer" wants, using any clues you can find. Again, you need to see things through his eyes.

To complicate matters, it may be that no human eyes are involved at all. Then, it's not a hiring manager you need to impress. Instead, it's an algorithm, an automated system that scans your resume for the right keywords. Without those keywords, no hiring manager will ever know how good you could have been. You can still use the buyer-first approach here by looking through the system's eyes and giving it the keywords it wants to find. 

There's a catch, of course, to adopting the buyer-first approach, but it's a catch worth tolerating if you want your resume to have maximum impact. 

Simply put, the catch is that there's more work to do. You have to tailor your resume to the needs of a particular employer. You have to highlight the achievements that really seem to matter to this company. You have to spell out the skills that matter in this specific job. You may have to emphasize experience or education in slightly different ways. In essence, you sell the pen differently to different buyers, and that means revising the resume you worked so hard to perfect. 

In the end, though, it's worth it. When you're in the job market, you're the pen, and putting extra effort into your sales pitch will seem like a small price to have paid if it helped you make this one very big sale.

Paul Freiberger is President of Shimmering Resumes and author of When Can You Start? Ace the Job Interview and Get Hired. For career help and resume writing and LinkedIn profiles, contact him at Paul@ShimmeringResumes.com.

 

Feature | 11/01/2018

Professor Sandip Sukhtankar co-authored an essay about India's Public Distribution System, a food security program, in the Hindustan Times

Feature | 08/06/2018

NEW FACULTY starting Fall of 2018!

Feature | 08/12/2016

A Healthier Work Day to Improve Productivity

Read about how one company in Japan is encouraging it's employees to make healthy changes to improve their productivity. (you may need to log into Handshake to access this article). 

Feature | 10/17/2016

From Vault: Prestigious Internships

"Today, Vault released its annual ranking of the 50 Most Prestigious Internships. This year, the ranking was based on a survey of more than 11,000 interns and former interns at more than 100 firms. Our survey asked interns to rate the prestige of other employers in order to determine which internships are the most desirable." (Derek Loosvelt)

Feature | 08/23/2017

ARTICLE - 7 THINGS TO NEVER SAY IN A JOB INTERVIEW

"It’s terrifying to know that the person you’re speaking to is weighing your every word—and could hold the power to change your future. This is why interviews can be so stressful, and why sometimes it can be hard not to blurt out the first thing that comes to mind. No matter how long you prep for the interview, it’s actual practice that gets one better at interviewing. And while there are many things you should say in a job interview, it can be harder to focus on the things not to say. We’ve got the seven things to steer clear of mentioning if you really want that job." -Kristina Rudic

 

Click here to read the rest of the article 

Feature | 01/10/2017

Article - How to Improve Your Networking Skills in 2017

"You've heard it before: The best way to land a new job is through networking and making connections. But many people are stumped as to what that means and how it plays out in reality, unless you're lucky enough to have been offered positions throughout your career. What exactly does making those connections look like, and how should you approach it?

There are many ways to do it – in person, through social media, phone or by email. All are valid and can be useful in different ways. Nothing can replace interactions in person, but it will require follow up. Some of the ways to develop new connections are to join groups with similar interests (hobbies or social), reach out to alumni from your school or find shared connections on LinkedIn. Once you begin the process of connecting, make sure you're making them count." - Marcelle Yeager

Learn more here: http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/articles/2017-01-06/how-to-network-better-in-2017

Feature | 08/30/2016

ARTICLE - Choosing a Career Path: A Collegiate Perspective

This is a guest piece by Elizabeth Santoro, a senior at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, who will begin her career at a technology company upon graduation.

In my experience, college leaves you with more questions than answers. Entering college you may or may not know what career you want or what direction to take. Either way, college seems to be anything but linear, — it’s more a series of switchbacks and loops.

I thought I would work for some Condé Nast beauty magazine among New York City’s skyscrapers or, on the flip side, dig deep as an investigative reporter. Graduating from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, I’m on a different spectrum entirely and accepted an offer to work in product marketing for a tech startup.

Click here to read the rest of the article.

Source: By April 20, 2017Talent

 

Feature | 10/18/2016

ECO NEWSLETTER 10.18.16

Job Postings from Alumni, Events, and this week an Alumna Profile, just for economics majors.

Feature | 10/02/2017

ARTICLE - 43 RESUME TIPS THAT WILL HELP GET YOU HIRED

"When you haven’t updated your resume in a while, it can be hard to know where to start. What experiences and accomplishments should you include for the jobs you’ve got your eye on? What new resume rules and trends should you be following? And seriously, one page or two?" - Erin Greenawald

 

Click here to read the rest of the article. 

Feature | 09/17/2018

The 30 Best Tips to Prepare for an Interview

 

  1. Spend a few hours learning everything you can about the company—from as many sources as you can. Talk to friends and contacts, read current news releases, and, yes, spend some time on Google. Often, candidates just look at the information a company is pushing out via the website and social media, but fail to look more in depth at what others are saying. By doing so, you’ll get the larger picture about the company (along with any negative press).

     

  2. Get a sense of “who” the company is and how to embody a similar personality during your interview. Start by reading the company’s blog and Facebook page—the tone of the company’s content on these sites will speak volumes. Or, try reading individual employees’ blogs to figure out what type of people work (and excel) there...Click here for more: https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-ultimate-interview-guide-30-prep-tips...

Feature | 11/27/2018

Megan Miller Presents at 111th Annual National Tax Association Conference in New Orleans

Megan Miller presented her paper “Labor supply responses to in-kind transfers: The case of Medicaid” at the 111th  Annual National Tax Association Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana.  Research presented at the conference covered topics including tax and expenditure policies, public finance, and government budgeting.  Hilary Hoynes and Michael Devereux were the keynote speakers at the conference.  Megan presented her work during the “Social Safety Net Programs and Labor Markets” session.  Her work studies the extent to which people reduce their earnings to qualify for Medicaid coverage, and she then uses that information to estimate the cash-equivalent value of Medicaid to beneficiaries.

Feature | 03/07/2018

ARTICLE: NETWORKING IS JUST CHATTING

"Networking. Just seeing the word is enough to make your palms sweaty and your mouth dry. When someone brings up the idea, you begin looking for a way to escape. But networking is essential to advancing in your career." - Karyn Mullins

Click here to read the rest of the article. 

Feature | 12/10/2015

45,000 Students and Professor Elzinga

"It’s likely that Ken Elzinga has impacted more students than any professor in University of Virginia history.

By the spring of 2015, the Robert C. Taylor Professor of Economics had taught nearly 45,000 students. That’s more than the population of Charlottesville, and more than any professor on record at U.Va., according to George Stovall, director of the Office of Institutional Assessment and Studies.

Those numbers stem from more than four decades of teaching one of U.Va.’s largest and most popular courses. The supply of seats in one of Elzinga’s two 500-person “Introduction to Microeconomics” classes never quite seems to meet demand. As for his smaller, 20-person anti-trust seminar, taught in the spring semester, students are advised to request entrance into the class two years ahead of time.

During his 47-year run at the University, Elzinga has become nationally renowned for both his illustrative teaching and his work in the field of economics, and famous for his personal commitments to each of his students outside the classroom." (Lauren Jones & Mitchell Powers). See the full story here.

To see the video click here.

Feature | 09/18/2017

5 WAYS TO MAKE A BETTER FIRST IMPRESSION

Feature | 08/25/2015

Meeting of the Minds

"Amid global stock market concerns, University of Virginia economists made the short drive down Interstate 64 to an institution responsible for implementing many of the policies they research: the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.

Friday’s biannual research symposium began two years ago when members of U.Va.’s economics faculty realized that the institutional partnership was not what it could be, despite numerous individual collaborations.

“The Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond Research Department is a world-class collection of researchers working on frontier problems in many fields, including banking, macroeconomic theory and household finance,” U.Va. professor Eric Young said. “The opportunity for faculty and students to interact and learn from these researchers was too good to pass up.” (Caroline Newman).

Learn more about this partnernship here.

Feature | 05/30/2017

ARTICLE - TOP 10 JOBS FOR ECONOMICS MAJORS

"If you're the analytical type, fascinated by the world around you, then an economics major might be a good choice for you. A degree in economics can be used in many areas, including public policy and finance. You can use an economics degree to study industry trends, labor markets, the prospects for individual companies, and the forces that drive the economy.

Economics majors learn to gather, organize, and interpret data, using mathematical formulas and statistics to make calculations. They also create models to predict the impact of investments, policy decisions, industry trends, demographics, climate change and much more."-Mike Profita

 

Click here to read the rest of the article. 

 

 

 

Feature | 09/29/2016

ECO NEWSLETTER 9.29.16

Hello << Test First Name >>,

Here is this week's Updates and Announcements listing from the Economics Career Office. Below you will find Job and Internship Announcements from alumni and employers, Articles from the ECO, and Job Expiration dates from OGI-Handshake. If you have any questions, please feel free to write.

All the best,
Jen

Upcoming Job Expiration Dates

Announcements (Examples: Credit Suisse Info Session, Jobs with the Federal Reserve in St. Louis and Chicago, Research Assistant at Columbia Business School)

Articles
Jobs for Economics Majors (Note, although this article includes a Top Ten List, the ECO does not claim that these are the "Top Ten" jobs for majors. This list is meant to be a resource in your search.

Career Advice for Economics Majors (Written for college students by a corporate economist/university professor.)

Networking for Economics Majors (Written for college students by a corporate economist/university professor.)

Economics Alum in the News with Innovative Technology

Tough Interview Questions (Just for fun, many of these questions are typically not for entry-level interviews, but the questions and answers are very informative and can be applied to all job searches!)

Feature | 08/07/2017

NEW FACULTY FOR FALL 2017!

The Department of Economics is delighted to welcome Leland Farmer as a new Assistant Professor this Fall 2017.

Professor Farmer uses a blend of cutting-edge empirical methods and economic theory to study linkages between the macroeconomy and the financial sector. He has developed new methods for quantitatively assessing the impact of nonlinearities in economic models. Prominent examples include the zero lower bound on interest rates and the role of stock market volatility in propagating financial crises. Estimates derived using Professor Farmer’s approach have informed the debate on financial regulation and on the monetary policy pursued by the Federal Reserve System. His research on learning demonstrates how  changing economic conditions can lead to short-run predictability of stock market returns.

In 2015, Professor Farmer was awarded the Clive Granger Fellowship at UCSD for the most promising graduate student research. He has presented his work at the 2017 NBER Summer Institute, the Federal Reserve Banks of Chicago and Atlanta, the Stanford Graduate School of Business, as well as a session on macro-financial modeling organized by the prestigious Becker-Friedman Institute. His newly published co-authored paper, “Discretizing nonlinear, non-Gaussian Markov processes with exact conditional moments,” appears in the July 2017 edition of Quantitative Economics.

He received his B.S. with Honors in Mathematical and Computational Science, with a Minor in Economics, from Stanford University in 2011. In 2017, he received his Ph.D. in Economics from UCSD under the supervision of James Hamilton and Allan Timmermann.

Professor Farmer will be teaching ECON 3720: Introduction to Econometrics this fall, and looks forward to teaching Macroeconomics and Econometrics at the Undergraduate and Graduate levels.

 

Feature | 08/12/2016

Tips from a former Morgan Stanley Intern

A former Morgan Stanley intern, Ellen Jin, turned full-time Credit Risk Analyst talks about her experience with finding an internship and how she worked her way up to where she is now!

Feature | 06/07/2018

How to Answer "What Sets You Apart from the Rest"

An extremely common interview question these days is some form of "What sets you apart from the rest of the candidates for this job?" Other incarnations of this question include "Why should we hire you?" and "What makes you so different from all the other people interviewing for this position?" No matter exactly how this question is worded, it's getting at the same thing: what are your greatest strengths and skills, what might make you unique, and how those strengths and skills and uniqueness will translate into success in the position you're interviewing for.

Feature | 08/22/2016

Maintaining Connections through Your Internship

See tips on how to maintain the professional connections you make through your internship.

Feature | 09/25/2018

Make a Powerful Interview Impact! (First Impressions Count!)

Feature | 06/07/2018

How to Answer "Why Do You Want to Work for Us?"

One of the more common interview questions these days, especially for entry-level positions, is some form of "Why do you want to work for us?" Other forms of this question include "What attracts you to our firm?" and "What about our firm excites you?" Whatever the exact phrasing you receive, there are a few things you want to get across as clearly and concisely as possible when answering.

Feature | 08/12/2016

Negotiating Your Salary

Factors to consider when negotiating your salary.

Feature | 08/30/2016

ECO Newsletter 8.30.16

Economics Internship and Job Search Basics Workshops - Now open!

Feature | 11/01/2016

ECO NEWSLETTER 11.1.16

Opportunities off the Beaten Path

Recruiting Timeline

Feature | 08/12/2016

A Must-Read for Job Seekers from the NACE

A Must-Read for Job Seekers from the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE)

Feature | 05/26/2017

ECO Newsletter 5.2.17

One week Business Lab in D.C. for Majors!

Feature | 02/14/2017

ECO NEWSLETTER 2.14.17

Goldman Sachs, Alibaba, Think Tanks and Non-profits - Read on!

Feature | 08/12/2016

Corporate Economists Are Hot Again

Corporate Economists are Hot Again

From The Wall Street Journal
By Bob Tita
Updated Feb. 27, 2014 6:01 p.m. ET

The number of private-sector economists has surged 57% as U.S. firms look for help digesting data.

(Photo disabled)

Pictured, economist Ryan Reed has revamped forecasting at Parker Hannifin. Photo by Michael F. McElroy for The Wall Street Journal

CLEVELAND—Flooded with data, Parker Hannifin Corp. PH +0.46% hired a young economist in 2008 to figure out what the information meant to the industrial conglomerate's far-flung operations.
What Ryan Reed told executives in one of his first presentations didn't go over well. Looking at capacity utilization rates—the percentage of available production capacity that is actually in use—Mr. Reed told executives that sales in the company's automation business would be substantially lower in October. "The guys said: 'That can't be right. October is normally a really good month for us.' "
But Mr. Reed's forecast was indeed correct. October wasn't a good month for automation, or for any of the Cleveland company's business units. The U.S. economy was on the verge of what would become the worst economic convulsion since the Great Depression. "We've lurched from crisis to crisis since then," said Mr. Reed, now 32 years old.

With more data available than ever before and markets increasingly unpredictable, U.S. companies—from manufacturers to banks and pharmaceutical companies—are expanding their corporate economist staffs. The number of private-sector economists surged 57% to 8,680 in 2012 from 5,510 in 2009, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In 2012, Wells Fargo WFC +0.77% & Co. had one economist in its corporate economics department. Now, it has six.
Sheryl Kirtley tests a hose at the Parker Hannifin manufacturing plant in Ravenna, Ohio. Michael F. McElroy for The Wall Street Journal
"A lot of companies have programmers who are able to process big data," said Tom Beers, executive director of the National Association for Business Economics in Washington, a professional organization with about 2,400 members. "But to find a causality between two things and draw a conclusion really takes somebody with an economics background."

Many companies had corporate economists on staff in the volatile 1970s and '80s, but dropped them when the U.S. economy was steady and strong. Information from government agencies, such as industrial output from the Federal Reserve, was plentiful, along with research from private consultants, including Macroeconomic Advisers LLC in St. Louis and IHS Global Insight of Englewood, Colo.
"The reaction in the corporate world was: 'I can get my average GDP forecasts from anybody. Why do I need an economist in my shop?' " said Ellen Hughes-Cromwick, chief economist for Ford Motor Co.
The key to the revival of in-house economists, companies and economists say, is the need to digest huge amounts of data—from production volumes in overseas markets to laptop usage in urban areas—to
determine opportunities and risks for companies' business units, not just in the U.S. but around the world.

Paul Thomas, chief economist for chip maker Intel Corp. INTC -0.49% , said he and his staff look at how and where consumers are using personal computers, laptops and hand-held devices to pinpoint what geographic markets are underserved and which ones are saturated. "It's something we're learning to do that's going to be useful," he said.
The glut of available data is forcing economists to serve as gatekeepers to ensure that disparate units within companies are using the same data sets and information inputs in their forecasting.
Richard DeKaser, a vice president and corporate economist at Wells Fargo, leads a team of eight people, including six economists, who standardize the models and data used to measure risk in different business units, such as mortgage lending and credit cards.
Previously, one unit might base unemployment figures on payroll data, while another would use household surveys. Doing so undermined the accuracy of tests to measure risks for losses and contributed to mistakes in business planning.
"The great recession laid bare a lot of fundamental mistakes that an economist can be useful in preventing," said Mr. DeKaser, who was previously chief economist for National City Bank.

Some corporate economists are also taking higher public profiles to communicate their companies' messages and forecasts. Mark Finley, general manager of global energy markets and U.S. economics for energy company BP BP -0.94% PLC, spends about 30% of his time on the road talking with customers, business groups, trade associations and reporters to build consensus for its outlooks on energy demand and pricing. "The economists are supposed to be out there presenting their views," he said.
James Meil, chief economist at diversified manufacturer Eaton Corp. ETN +0.68% , and his staff of four, made 78 formal presentations last year, including one to the Association for Hose and Accessories Distribution. Distributors and suppliers, especially smaller ones, often rely on economists from their bigger customers to help decide whether they should add production capacity.
"There's not readily available market data or trends data available for the hose markets," said Joseph Thompson, executive vice president of the association, which represents manufacturers and distributors of industrial hoses, fittings and fluid-transferring equipment.
Veteran economists like Mr. Meil, who has been with Eaton for 29 years, are consulted on big acquisitions. When Eaton bought Cooper Industries PLC in 2012 for about $11.8 billion, he provided market research for key business segments and forecasts for the combined company's end markets.

Air Products and Chemicals Inc. uses its economist to devise hedges in a more volatile global economic climate. The Pennsylvania-based supplier of industrial gases enters into 10- to 20-year contracts with drug companies, steelmakers and refineries and needs price-escalator clauses to reflect higher production costs, such as energy.
"We set up formulas to where we're just trying to capture the inflationary pressure on the underlying contract," said economist Joseph Cardinale, who recently left Air Products for an economist's job at Illinois-basedpharmaceutical maker Abbott Laboratories.
Like all forecasters, corporate economists can miss the mark. In 2012 many company economists expected about 6.5% growth in manufacturing output in Asia. But it ended up being 3.5% due to a sluggish economy in China. "Forecasts by definition are going to be wrong," said Mr. Cardinale.

Retired economist Frank Schott, 87 years old, said new veins of data don't guarantee accuracy in forecasts. "The data are just as recalcitrant as ever to give you answers and the multiplicity of it invites further confusion," he said. "Everybody, including corporate bosses, thinks they're their own best economist."

Before Parker hired Mr. Reed, group presidents provided forecasts. "They weren't very accurate," said Jeff Cullman, president of Parker's hydraulic business. He said Mr. Reed has been able to forecast when hydraulic demand was about to fall, allowing the company to get a head start on scaling back production. "The market turns relatively quickly, but it takes us about three months to get on the brakes,' he said.
Forecasting can be tougher in developing countries where market demand can be difficult to quantify and data is spotty. Mr. Reed recently constructed a model for Parker's new president of Latin America to
indicate where the company should focus sales efforts. "His gut was telling him we're doing pretty well in Brazil; maybe we should look more at Argentina," he said.
By parceling out Parker's sales in specific industrial markets in Argentina and Brazil and comparing them with the two countries' total output in those markets, Mr. Reed demonstrated that Parker's sales potential in Brazil was far greater than in Argentina and to remain focused there. "Hopefully we avoided putting a lot of resources into Argentina where there's just not much to capture," he said.
Write to Bob Tita at robert.tita@wsj.com

Feature | 01/06/2017

ARTICLE- HOW TO NETWORK BETTER IN 2017

"You've heard it before: The best way to land a new job is through networking and making connections. But many people are stumped as to what that means and how it plays out in reality, unless you're lucky enough to have been offered positions throughout your career. What exactly does making those connections look like, and how should you approach it?"- Marcelle Yeager

Click here to read the rest of the article 

Feature | 01/18/2018

ECO Winter Break Trek to NYC 1.12.18

The ECO and nine students trekked to the NYC area over Winter Break to visit two power-house firms run by economics majors. First we visited private equity firm Kelso in Manhattan followed by a visit to W&P Design in Greenpoint, NYC an urban-industrial hot spot in Brooklyn. Details of our visit follow, but one important take away from both visits was the power of the UVA network. Our alumni discussed this directly and indirectly as benefiting them personally and in their professional work.

At Kelso, we met UVA economics alumnus CEO Frank Loverro and Managing Director, UVA History alumnus Frank Bynum in their plush offices on Park Ave. Firm V.P. Bill Frayer. (Colgate University) walked us through the recruiting process for PE and several deals that the firm has worked on. Kelso invests primarily in middle market companies in Energy, Healthcare, Financial Services, Consumer Goods, Industrial, and Media. We learned about the deal process from idea sourcing through valuation, purchasing, management, and selling. We also heard how both Frank and Frank acquired their jobs at Kelso and what their work is like at the senior level. We met UVA McIntire School alumnus Forrest Compton, who discussed his background at Credit Suisse before moving to Kelso and Dan Slutsky's (Brown) experiences with Kelso as an Associate after moving from M&A at Bank of America. The attending students made some great connections for future opportunities. Kelso looks forward to staying connected to the department. 

Our next stop was W&P Design, "a unique full-stack product design company. The firm sees ideas through from design, to manufacturing and delivery. Economics alumnus Josh Williams gave us a tour of their open, contemporary multi-use space in an industrial section of Brooklyn overlooking the Hudson River. It offered a different office culture than Kelso and our UVA students had a chance to observe these very different work environments. The space houses a design team, sales team, operations and logistics, marketing, and production team. Manufacturing and most distribution are off-site. In just five years the company has grown from a staff of 2 (Josh and fellow UVA alumnus and long-time friend Eric Prum) to 80 employees in the states and 100 employees including their overseas staff. Their first round of major funding was for a particular product "the mason shaker" and was crowd-sourced through Kickstarter.  It was one of the most successful Kickstarter campaigns at the time seeking a goal of $5,000 and reaching $75,000. The company's products are in catalogs all over the world and in stores like Nordstrom, Bloomingdales, and Williams-Sonoma. But even with that national and international reach, they keep much business close to home in NYC and in Central Virginia. Their primary distribution center is close to Lynchburg.

A new major project for Josh and Eric is the launch of their consumer goods incubator, Assembly. It is an innovative model where ideas are conceived through the company leadership and then teams are hired to build the products and launch the newly founded company. They are hiring summer interns in sales and design, and full time staff in sales, design and project management. They are also seeking Co-Founders of their newest brands. 

Both Josh and Eric had other jobs before launching W&P, Josh with Lehman Brothers/Barclays and Eric working for a paintball manufacturing company. They got their first taste of owning their own business running a catering company in Charlottesville while they were students.

After leaving Barclay's, Josh attended Culinary School in New Orleans and soon after Eric and Josh launched W&PDesign, they brought on a former intern and friend, UVA alumna Elizabeth Tilton, to build out and run their marketing department. You can read more about all three UVA alumni and W&P Design here.

This first ECO trip was a huge success and we thank our alumni for making it so.

 

 

Feature | 03/28/2017

Higher Education: lower income students College selections

"Caroline Hoxby [Stanford] and Sarah Turner [UVA] have argued that schools should partner with the College Board or another institution to do this kind of outreach en masse, and grealty increase their share of lower-income students."

Feature | 06/05/2015

A More Efficient 'Match Day'

"This month, newly minted doctors and military cadets are leaving the University of Virginia and many other schools for assigned residency and branch assignments around the globe. These movements number in the millions, but most are directed by a simple class of “matching algorithms” – algorithms that one U.Va.-led research team wants to make more efficient and fair.

Peter Troyan, an assistant professor of economics, became interested in the match algorithm while a friend in medical school was anxiously awaiting his residency assignment. Troyan was eager to understand the equation that was driving the next steps of his friend’s life and those of many others worldwide..." (Caroline Newman)

For more on this article, click here.

Feature | 09/06/2018

Diego Legal-Cañisá, Participant in the new Initiative for Computational Economics (nICE)

Computational technologies are exploding in their ability to analyze complex scientific problems. In August 2018, 5th year PhD student Diego Legal-Cañisá attended the new Initiative for Computational Economics (nICE), organized by Kenneth Judd at Stanford's Hoover Institution, which focused on how these technologies could be applied to the analysis of economic problems. Diego (seen in the accompanying picture, seated in the second row, first from the left) cites the many benefits of participating in nICE: "It was an excellent experience where the state of art numerical methods and their application to economics problems were surveyed. I learned about some powerful software tools, I heard some of the leading experts in computational economics presenting the latest developments in the field, and most importantly, I presented my research--focusing on its computational aspects--and discussed it with top researchers and fellow graduate students from other universities."

Feature | 09/27/2016

ARTICLE- HOW TO PREPARE FOR THE "TELL ME ABOUT YOURSELF" INTERVIEW QUESTION

"We all know the question is coming: So tell me a little about yourself.

Here’s the funny thing: even though we’re expecting it, most of us don’t feel fully prepared to respond. How can this question seem like a no-brainer, but then end up being so tricky? Well, for one, it’s easy to get mired down by all the possibilities of just how to answer it. The key is to approach the question strategically, making sure it has a clear story and distinct purpose. Here are 4 ways to help you prepare to ace the prompt: “Tell me about yourself.'"-Caroline Grey

 

Click here to read the rest of the article

Feature | 06/07/2015

A Beautiful Algorithm?

"The online ad that led you to your new favorite pair of shoes might seem innocuous, but according to University of Virginia Associate Professor of Economics and Computer Science Denis Nekipelov, the algorithms behind such ads could lead to an unforeseen financial crash – something he hopes his research will prevent.

Nekipelov’s study of the automation of online advertising, co-authored with Vasilis Syrgkanis, a researcher at Microsoft, and Éva Tardos, a professor at Cornell University, struck a nerve among industry giants and was named “Best Paper” at the ACM Conference on Economics and Computation, a prestigious international conference for computer science. 

Companies like Google, Microsoft or Facebook allocate advertising space through automated auctions. Advertisers place bids in the hope that their product appears when you search for something like “black high heels.” Humans are physically incapable of placing real-time bids for every query, so automating the bid process was a natural step.

In theory, automated auctions should arrive at an optimum price via John Nash’s equilibrium principle, enshrined in pop culture by the movie “A Beautiful Mind.” The principle assumes bidders fully understand other bidders’ strategies and will use that knowledge to arrive at their own stable bidding strategies. In practice, Nekipelov’s research demonstrates that the Nash equilibrium is unrealistic for today’s online advertising markets." (Caroline Newman)

See the full story here.

Feature | 10/10/2018

Alumni Spotlight: Eden Green

Alumni Spotlight: EDEN GREEN, Allison Partners

 

Life before UVA:

Eden is from a military family. She is one of severn children and grew up primarily in Northern Virginia. She was homeschooled until high school.

 

Life at UVA and since graduating:

Eden graduated from the University of Virginia in 2016 with a degree in Economics and Psychology. As an undergraduate, she served as a research assistant for the Olsson Center for Applied Ethics at the Darden School of Business, where she studied corporate social responsibility, and with UVA’s Department of Psychology, where she examined the relationships between happiness, social interaction, and technology.

 

She now works as an organizational development consultant at Allison Partners and spends her days exploring what makes people and organizations work effectively. She incorporates her interests in curriculum development, academic research, and behavioral economics into her work supporting client projects, creating training materials, conducting analysis, and managing proposals.

 

In your own words, what is Organizational Development Consulting? 

We help with the messy, wonderful, complicated people stuff that happens when more than one person is in a room.

 

Advice to job seekers from Eden:

  • Build relationships with faculty by getting involved in undergraduate research
  • Always follow up on contacts that faculty / other supervisors may give to you
  • Conduct informational interviews with people who work in fields that interest you and fields that don’t
  • Learn to talk about yourself and your interests; know your story
  • Read! Lean about and be able to discuss current research in your fields of interest
  • Do more than match your interests with jobs—think about the kind of daily routine you really want

 

Eden’s Recommended Reading for Interviews

  • Tell Me About Yourself: Storytelling to Get Jobs and Propel Your Career by Katherine Hansen

Eden’s Recommended Reading for Organizational Development Consulting

  • The Art of Gathering: How We Meet and Why It Matters by Priya Parker
  • Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When the Stakes Are High by Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, and Al Switzler

Feature | 01/13/2017

Influential Education Scholar and #3 Ranking!

Prof. Sarah Turner listed as one of the 9 UVA Influential Education Scholars, AND the ECON Undergraduate Program ranked No. 3 by College Choice!

Feature | 09/12/2018

Devaki Ghose, Invited to International Econ Program at Dartmouth

In 2017, the Department of Economics at Dartmouth College began a Visiting Ph.D. Program in International Economics.  According to the program website “The program will provide funding to current Ph.D. students with high potential who have completed their coursework to visit Dartmouth College. There are no teaching or RA obligations associated with the position: visiting students are simply expected to be active members of the vibrant Dartmouth international economics community. “ Students from universities around the world apply and, each academic term, one is admitted to the program. Devaki was selected during the 2018 winter term and describe it as “one of the most rewarding experiences I had in recent years. My supervisor at Dartmouth, Treb Allen, not only provided invaluable academic input, but also encouraged me to dream bigger and push my ideas further. The vibrant academic community there, comprised of established professors and enterprising post-doctoral students, provided me with constructive criticism and fresh ideas that infused my project with new energy. I think what makes Dartmouth a very special place is that it is a top school with no graduate program in economics. Being the only graduate student for the term, all the professors had lots of time to talk about my research and interact with me. I will recommend every student in international economics to consider applying for this program in future.”

 

Feature | 10/06/2016

Interview: The Impact of NAFTA with Professor John McLaren

"UVA economics professor John McLaren, along with co-author and UVA graduate alumna Sushanik Hakobyan, recently published a study examining how NAFTA has impacted wage growth in the United States, breaking down results by industry and geographic area.

Looking to determine exactly where and how NAFTA has impacted American workers, McLaren and Hakobyan studied wage growth among employed workers by comparing census data from 1990 and 2000. They found that, while the majority of workers’ wages were not noticeably impacted, a significant minority experienced substantial reductions in wage growth that could be directly correlated with NAFTA.

UVA Today spoke with McLaren to learn more about what his data reveals." (Caroline Newman)

Read the full interview here.

Feature | 07/12/2018

6 Ways to Make the Most of Your Summer Internship

Vincent Tsui for HBR

Around 75% of college students, at some point, work in an internship. These experiences can be tremendously valuable, providing young workers the opportunity to build skills for their resumes and meet people who are working in their preferred industry. Increasingly, they are the likeliest route to full-time employment and are even offered year-round rather than only during summer months. But they can also be difficult adjustments for young people who have little to no experience in professional offices. It can be hard for someone to stand out and make the right impression during a three-month stint spent adapting to such a new environment.

How can interns learn what they need to know, impress those they work for, and secure a job recommendation or full-time offer in such a brief period of time? I consulted 20 professionals who have worked with or supervised interns in higher education, business, law, and nonprofits, and compiled the most valuable advice for interns from their stories, my own observations, and management literature. This advice won’t cover everything, but it does offer a starting point for interns.

Start with relentless punctuality. Show up on time (or early) in the morning, arrive for meetings before they begin, and complete tasks by their deadlines. When I asked professional contacts for their advice to interns, they consistently listed punctuality as a critical success factor. Ryan, an executive in a municipal government, says, “Always be on time. Summer internships are for a short, defined period of time, so give it 100%. Be willing to get to the office early and stay late.” As an intern, you are both a guest in a new environment and a colleague on whom others must rely — make sure that you respect those colleagues by being on time.

Complete each task with excellence. Whether an assignment is mundane or exotic, pursue it with relentless drive and a determination to exceed. If you’re asked to make coffee, make the best coffee your colleagues have ever had. If you’re asked to make an Excel model, over-invest your time and effort in assuring it’s right, aesthetically appealing, and thorough. Amy, a food and beverage executive puts it this way, “Finish the assignment or project with excellence — anything else you do is bonus, but please start with the assignment given.” Even if the project seems small or unimportant, do not give in to the temptation to complete it with anything less than your best, and don’t decline a project just because it doesn’t interest you. Katie, a tech industry executive cautions to “[never] say no to small opportunities because [they don’t] fit your idea of work.” Repeated, enthusiastic, and excellent delivery of assigned tasks is the building block upon which everything else in your internship will rest.

Take on more work — without being asked. Use excess time to take on new and important work, assignments others don’t want, or projects that are needed but not yet clearly defined. A nonprofit healthcare executive counsels, “When you see something you can do, do it.” I still remember the names of interns I’ve worked with who never let themselves sit idle and took on new projects with little or no guidance. Gary, a finance executive, told me, “Sitting at the desk checking your most recent Twitter feed while you wait for someone to give you something to do is one of the best ways to not get an invite back.” Deliver what no one is expecting — or what no one else is willing to do — and you’ll not only be appreciated, but remembered.

Be resourceful. Research a topic thoroughly before asking a full-time colleague or manager for help, and take the time to reflect and come up with your own insight or solution before consulting others when you uncover a problem. Amy, the food and beverage executive above, recommends, “Look for the resources you need on the internal websites or ask other interns before [asking] your coach.” She notes that it’s a mistake to “ask too many questions that show you didn’t even try to look for the answer yourself.” It’s critical that your colleagues view you as someone who is resourceful and independent enough to bring something new to the table instead of just stopping every time there is a bump in the road.

Ask questions — good ones. The hallmark of an intellectually curious, diligent colleague is the quality of his or her questions. Renowned management thinker Clay Christensen recommends spending time formulating the right questions. Ben, a management consultant, agrees: “Think — in advance — of questions to ask. If you are meeting with a peer or superior, think of thoughtful questions you can ask to demonstrate you’ve prepared for the meeting and respect her time.” If you’re in a meeting with senior colleagues, think less about your answers to their questions and more about what you see missing — the questions no one else is asking. When you hear someone ask a great, conversation-altering question, write it down and reflect on what made it so special. And, as a rule of thumb, make sure you ask one or more authentic questions in every meeting you attend. Following this advice will hone your ability to ask questions that lead to real insight and will ingrain in you the essential habit of intellectual curiosity.

Build professional relationships. Internships usually last only a few months, and in that context, it’s easy to either focus solely on your work or to make connections only with the other interns working around you. But forming broad, deep relationships within your team and throughout the organization can help you manage your current responsibilities while also boosting personal development. You’ll also make yourself more memorable to those around you and create a network of contacts to reach out to when you’re ready to find your next job. Invite colleagues to lunch. Ask them questions in informational interviews. Offer to help where you can. Observe the great relationship-builders in your firm and learn from them.

Internships are hard work. And doing only what’s expected of you isn’t enough to be noticed. You need to go above and beyond, from arriving on time to doing exemplary work, and make the most of your time in the organization.

Feature | 02/07/2017

ECO NEWSLETTER 2.7.17

Another Career Fair Approaches! New Job Postings! Economics Career Forum!

Feature | 09/11/2018

How to Answer the 31 Most Common Interview Questions - from The Muse

Wouldn't it be great if you knew exactly what a hiring manager would be asking you in your next job interview?

While we unfortunately can't read minds, we'll give you the next best thing: a list of the 31 most commonly asked interview questions and answers.

While we don't recommend having a canned response for every interview question (in fact, please don't), we do recommend spending some time getting comfortable with what you might be asked, what hiring managers are really looking for in your responses, and what it takes to show that you're the right man or woman for the job.

Consider this list your interview question study guide.

 

1. Can you tell me a little about yourself?

This question seems simple, so many people fail to prepare for it, but it's crucial. Here's the deal: Don't give your complete employment (or personal) history. Instead give a pitch—one that’s concise and compelling and that shows exactly why you’re the right fit for the job. Start off with the 2-3 specific accomplishments or experiences that you most want the interviewer to know about, then wrap up talking about how that prior experience has positioned you for this specific role.

Read More

 

2. How did you hear about the position?

Another seemingly innocuous interview question, this is actually a perfect opportunity to stand out and show your passion for and connection to the company. For example, if you found out about the gig through a friend or professional contact, name drop that person, then share why you were so excited about it. If you discovered the company through an event or article, share that. Even if you found the listing through a random job board, share what, specifically, caught your eye about the role.

Read More

 

3. What do you know about the company?

Any candidate can read and regurgitate the company’s “About” page. So, when interviewers ask this, they aren't necessarily trying to gauge whether you understand the mission—they want to know whether you care about it. Start with one line that shows you understand the company's goals, using a couple key words and phrases from the website, but then go on to make it personal. Say, “I’m personally drawn to this mission because…” or “I really believe in this approach because…” and share a personal example or two.

Read More

 

4. Why do you want this job?

Again, companies want to hire people who are passionate about the job, so you should have a great answer about why you want the position. (And if you don't? You probably should apply elsewhere.) First, identify a couple of key factors that make the role a great fit for you (e.g., “I love customer support because I love the constant human interaction and the satisfaction that comes from helping someone solve a problem"), then share why you love the company (e.g., “I’ve always been passionate about education, and I think you guys are doing great things, so I want to be a part of it”).

Read More

 

5. Why should we hire you?

This interview question seems forward (not to mention intimidating!), but if you're asked it, you're in luck: There's no better setup for you to sell yourself and your skills to the hiring manager. Your job here is to craft an answer that covers three things: that you can not only do the work, you can deliver great results; that you'll really fit in with the team and culture; and that you'd be a better hire than any of the other candidates.

Read More

 

 

6. What are your greatest professional strengths?

When answering this question, interview coach Pamela Skillings recommends being accurate (share your true strengths, not those you think the interviewer wants to hear); relevant (choose your strengths that are most targeted to this particular position); and specific (for example, instead of “people skills,” choose “persuasive communication” or “relationship building”). Then, follow up with an example of how you've demonstrated these traits in a professional setting.

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7. What do you consider to be your weaknesses?

What your interviewer is really trying to do with this question—beyond identifying any major red flags—is to gauge your self-awareness and honesty. So, “I can't meet a deadline to save my life” is not an option—but neither is “Nothing! I'm perfect!” Strike a balance by thinking of something that you struggle with but that you’re working to improve. For example, maybe you’ve never been strong at public speaking, but you've recently volunteered to run meetings to help you be more comfortable when addressing a crowd.

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8. What is your greatest professional achievement?

Nothing says “hire me” better than a track record of achieving amazing results in past jobs, so don't be shy when answering this interview question! A great way to do so is by using the S-T-A-R method: Set up the situation and the task that you were required to complete to provide the interviewer with background context (e.g., “In my last job as a junior analyst, it was my role to manage the invoicing process”), but spend the bulk of your time describing what you actually did (the action) and what you achieved (the result). For example, “In one month, I streamlined the process, which saved my group 10 man-hours each month and reduced errors on invoices by 25%.”

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9. Tell me about a challenge or conflict you've faced at work, and how you dealt with it.

In asking this interview question, “your interviewer wants to get a sense of how you will respond to conflict. Anyone can seem nice and pleasant in a job interview, but what will happen if you’re hired and Gladys in Compliance starts getting in your face?” says Skillings. Again, you'll want to use the S-T-A-R method, being sure to focus on how you handled the situation professionally and productively, and ideally closing with a happy ending, like how you came to a resolution or compromise.

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10. Where do you see yourself in five years?

If asked this question, be honest and specific about your future goals, but consider this: A hiring manager wants to know a) if you've set realistic expectations for your career, b) if you have ambition (a.k.a., this interview isn't the first time you're considering the question), and c) if the position aligns with your goals and growth. Your best bet is to think realistically about where this position could take you and answer along those lines. And if the position isn’t necessarily a one-way ticket to your aspirations? It’s OK to say that you’re not quite sure what the future holds, but that you see this experience playing an important role in helping you make that decision.

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11. What's your dream job?

Along similar lines, the interviewer wants to uncover whether this position is really in line with your ultimate career goals. While “an NBA star” might get you a few laughs, a better bet is to talk about your goals and ambitions—and why this job will get you closer to them.

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12. What other companies are you interviewing with?

Companies ask this for a number of reasons, from wanting to see what the competition is for you to sniffing out whether you're serious about the industry. “Often the best approach is to mention that you are exploring a number of other similar options in the company's industry,” says job search expert Alison Doyle. “It can be helpful to mention that a common characteristic of all the jobs you are applying to is the opportunity to apply some critical abilities and skills that you possess. For example, you might say 'I am applying for several positions with IT consulting firms where I can analyze client needs and translate them to development teams in order to find solutions to technology problems.'”

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13. Why are you leaving your current job?

This is a toughie, but one you can be sure you'll be asked. Definitely keep things positive—you have nothing to gain by being negative about your past employers. Instead, frame things in a way that shows that you're eager to take on new opportunities and that the role you’re interviewing for is a better fit for you than your current or last position. For example, “I’d really love to be part of product development from beginning to end, and I know I’d have that opportunity here.” And if you were let go? Keep it simple: “Unfortunately, I was let go,” is a totally OK answer.

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14. Why were you fired?

OK, if you get the admittedly much tougher follow-up question as to why you were let go (and the truth isn't exactly pretty), your best bet is to be honest (the job-seeking world is small, after all). But it doesn't have to be a deal-breaker. Share how you’ve grown and how you approach your job and life now as a result. If you can position the learning experience as an advantage for this next job, even better.

Read More

 

15. What are you looking for in a new position?

Hint: Ideally the same things that this position has to offer. Be specific.

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16. What type of work environment do you prefer?

Hint: Ideally one that's similar to the environment of the company you're applying to. Be specific.

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17. What's your management style?

The best managers are strong but flexible, and that's exactly what you want to show off in your answer. (Think something like, “While every situation and every team member requires a bit of a different strategy, I tend to approach my employee relationships as a coach...”) Then, share a couple of your best managerial moments, like when you grew your team from five to 15 or coached an underperforming employee to become the company's top salesperson.

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18. What's a time you exercised leadership?

Depending on what's more important for the the role, you'll want to choose an example that showcases your project management skills (spearheading a project from end to end, juggling multiple moving parts) or one that shows your ability to confidently and effectively rally a team. And remember: “The best stories include enough detail to be believable and memorable,” says Skillings. “Show how you were a leader in this situation and how it represents your overall leadership experience and potential.”

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19. What's a time you disagreed with a decision that was made at work?

Everyone disagrees with the boss from time to time, but in asking this interview question, hiring managers want to know that you can do so in a productive, professional way. “You don’t want to tell the story about the time when you disagreed but your boss was being a jerk and you just gave in to keep the peace. And you don’t want to tell the one where you realized you were wrong,” says Peggy McKee of Career Confidential. “Tell the one where your actions made a positive difference on the outcome of the situation, whether it was a work-related outcome or a more effective and productive working relationship.”

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20. How would your boss and co-workers describe you?

First of all, be honest (remember, if you get this job, the hiring manager will be calling your former bosses and co-workers!). Then, try to pull out strengths and traits you haven't discussed in other aspects of the interview, such as your strong work ethic or your willingness to pitch in on other projects when needed.

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21. Why was there a gap in your employment?

If you were unemployed for a period of time, be direct and to the point about what you’ve been up to (and hopefully, that’s a litany of impressive volunteer and other mind-enriching activities, like blogging or taking classes). Then, steer the conversation toward how you will do the job and contribute to the organization: “I decided to take a break at the time, but today I’m ready to contribute to this organization in the following ways.”

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22. Can you explain why you changed career paths?

Don't be thrown off by this question—just take a deep breath and explain to the hiring manager why you've made the career decisions you have. More importantly, give a few examples of how your past experience is transferrable to the new role. This doesn't have to be a direct connection; in fact, it's often more impressive when a candidate can make seemingly irrelevant experience seem very relevant to the role.

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23. How do you deal with pressure or stressful situations?

"Choose an answer that shows that you can meet a stressful situation head-on in a productive, positive manner and let nothing stop you from accomplishing your goals," says McKee. A great approach is to talk through your go-to stress-reduction tactics (making the world's greatest to-do list, stopping to take 10 deep breaths), and then share an example of a stressful situation you navigated with ease.

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24. What would your first 30, 60, or 90 days look like in this role?

Start by explaining what you'd need to do to get ramped up. What information would you need? What parts of the company would you need to familiarize yourself with? What other employees would you want to sit down with? Next, choose a couple of areas where you think you can make meaningful contributions right away. (e.g., “I think a great starter project would be diving into your email marketing campaigns and setting up a tracking system for them.”) Sure, if you get the job, you (or your new employer) might decide there’s a better starting place, but having an answer prepared will show the interviewer where you can add immediate impact—and that you’re excited to get started.

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25. What are your salary requirements?

The #1 rule of answering this question is doing your research on what you should be paid by using sites like Payscale and Glassdoor. You’ll likely come up with a range, and we recommend stating the highest number in that range that applies, based on your experience, education, and skills. Then, make sure the hiring manager knows that you're flexible. You're communicating that you know your skills are valuable, but that you want the job and are willing to negotiate.

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26. What do you like to do outside of work?

Interviewers ask personal questions in an interview to “see if candidates will fit in with the culture [and] give them the opportunity to open up and display their personality, too,” says longtime hiring manager Mitch Fortner. “In other words, if someone asks about your hobbies outside of work, it’s totally OK to open up and share what really makes you tick. (Do keep it semi-professional, though: Saying you like to have a few beers at the local hot spot on Saturday night is fine. Telling them that Monday is usually a rough day for you because you’re always hungover is not.)”

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27. If you were an animal, which one would you want to be?

Seemingly random personality-test type questions like these come up in interviews generally because hiring managers want to see how you can think on your feet. There's no wrong answer here, but you'll immediately gain bonus points if your answer helps you share your strengths or personality or connect with the hiring manager. Pro tip: Come up with a stalling tactic to buy yourself some thinking time, such as saying, “Now, that is a great question. I think I would have to say… ”

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28. How many tennis balls can you fit into a limousine?

1,000? 10,000? 100,000? Seriously?

Well, seriously, you might get asked brainteaser questions like these, especially in quantitative jobs. But remember that the interviewer doesn’t necessarily want an exact number—he wants to make sure that you understand what’s being asked of you, and that you can set into motion a systematic and logical way to respond. So, just take a deep breath, and start thinking through the math. (Yes, it’s OK to ask for a pen and paper!)

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29. Are you planning on having children?

Questions about your family status, gender (“How would you handle managing a team of all men?”), nationality (“Where were you born?”), religion, or age, are illegal—but they still get asked (and frequently). Of course, not always with ill intent—the interviewer might just be trying to make conversation—but you should definitely tie any questions about your personal life (or anything else you think might be inappropriate) back to the job at hand. For this question, think: “You know, I’m not quite there yet. But I am very interested in the career paths at your company. Can you tell me more about that?”

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30. What do you think we could do better or differently?

This is a common one at startups (and one of our personal favorites here at The Muse). Hiring managers want to know that you not only have some background on the company, but that you're able to think critically about it and come to the table with new ideas. So, come with new ideas! What new features would you love to see? How could the company increase conversions? How could customer service be improved? You don’t need to have the company’s four-year strategy figured out, but do share your thoughts, and more importantly, show how your interests and expertise would lend themselves to the job.

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31. Do you have any questions for us?

You probably already know that an interview isn't just a chance for a hiring manager to grill you—it's your opportunity to sniff out whether a job is the right fit for you. What do you want to know about the position? The company? The department? The team?

You'll cover a lot of this in the actual interview, so have a few less-common questions ready to go. We especially like questions targeted to the interviewer (“What's your favorite part about working here?") or the company's growth (“What can you tell me about your new products or plans for growth?")

Read More

Feature | 09/12/2016

ECO NEWSLETTER 9.12.17

Updates from the ECO with Jobs, Events, and Workshops!

Feature | 12/08/2016

Professor Eric Chyn: The Future of National Housing Policies

"Even before graduating from his Ph.D. program in August, Eric Chyn earned widespread acclaim for research that, according to its coverage in The New York Times, “could fundamentally reshape national housing policy.”

Chyn, who will start in January as an assistant professor in the University of Virginia’s Department of Economics, wanted to learn more about how living in public housing impacts a child’s income and employment over his or her lifetime.

“Broadly, my interest is in studying government programs and the way we spend money in society to make people better off, especially those who are disadvantaged,” Chyn said. “Housing assistance is a very sizeable and notable expenditure in the grand scheme of what the government does.”

Existing studies showed that children whose parents opted into a lottery system moving them from public to private housing tended to fare better as adults, especially if they moved while very young. However, Chyn found a gap in that approach: only 25 percent of eligible families applied for the lottery. He conjectured that parents who applied were already particularly motivated to protect their children from negative environments, and therefore might not be the best sample to study. What, he wondered, happened to the other 75 percent of children?"

- Caroline Newman, see original article.

Photo credit: Dan Addison, University Communications

Feature | 08/12/2016

Is Working Abroad for you

Test Your IQ (International Quotient) to See If Working Abroad Is for You

Thinking about working overseas? Take this quiz to see if it working abroad is for you. (You may need to log into Handshake to access this article). 

Feature | 09/27/2016

Professor Ed Olsen Calls for Low-Income Housing Reform

"Olsen is a professor of economics and a professor of public policy in the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy. He began studying low-income housing assistance in the 1960s, shortly before joining the UVA faculty in 1970. He was one of only two economists in the country studying housing assistance and was invited to serve on President Richard Nixon’s Housing Policy Review Task Force in the early 1970s. In the decades since that appointment, he has testified before Senate and House committees several times, provided research and expertise to policymakers and generated some of the most respected studies in his field.

On Wednesday, Olsen spoke in a subcommittee hearing discussing better ways to house vulnerable families. He highlighted the benefits of offering rent subsidy vouchers for existing housing instead of continuing to subsidize the construction and maintenance of the subsidized housing projects that have proliferated in the U.S." (Caroline Newman)

See Professor Olsen's paper and oral testimonies:

Read more here: https://news.virginia.edu/content/senate-hearing-uva-economist-calls-low-income-housing-reform?utm_source=DailyReport&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=news

(Photo by Dan Addison, University Communications)

Feature | 08/12/2016

4 Interview Questions Venture Capital Firms Ask

Venture capital interviews aren’t tricky. Generally, there are no brainteasers or case questions. A VC interview is a chance for venture capitalists to get a sense of you, the same way they do when meeting with entrepreneurs. That’s how venture capitalists make investment decisions—(You may need to login into CavLink to access this article).

Feature | 03/24/2015

Research at the Frontiers in Big Data

"As the sheer volume of data in a range of computationally intensive fields grows bigger, computer scientists, engineers and researchers from across the disciplines are finding that work involving “big data” increasingly lands at the intersection of disciplines.  Denis Nekipelov, a new associate professor of economics at the University of Virginia, calls it “research at the frontiers.” (Fariss Samarrai)

To read more of this article, click here.

Feature | 12/28/2017

Amanda Pallais, a former Economics undergraduate, makes a best of the year list (twice) for "research that mattered most in 2017"

Feature | 09/12/2018

4th Year Student, Devaki Ghose, Presents at CEP Workshp In Geneva

In April 2018, 4th year student Devaki Ghose, presented a paper at a workshop--cohosted by the World Trade Organization (WTO), the International Monetary Fund (IMG), the World Bank (WB), and the Center for Economic Policy (CEP)--held at the WTO’s Geneva headquarters, titled Trade Policy, Inclusiveness and the Rise of the Service Economy. The workshop’s goal: to dig deeper into the question of how and to what extent services trade can benefit from removing barriers to trade and how these benefits can translate into positive societal outcomes. From a field of established presenters and authors, including many professors from prestigious universities, such as the London School of Economics and the University of Nottingham, as well as policy practitioners from international organizations such as the WTO, IMF, WB and the OECD, Devaki was one of 10 selected to offer a full 45-minute presentation. In her paper, “Did the Rise of Service Off-shoring and IT-Boom Change India’s Economic Landscape?”, she quantifies how the rise in the India’s IT industry, fueled by off-shoring demand from abroad, changed India’s growth story by looking at changes in educational outcomes, employment and wages; she also studies how this IT boom was fostered by the growth of engineering education in India. Devaki, who has previously presented at conferences and seminars at Dartmouth college, University of Nottingham, the Lindau Nobel Laureates Meeting and the Eastern Economic Association Conference, described the workshop as “a unique opportunity to present my work to both academicians and policy makers. I believe feedback from this audience will enrich my research and help me develop future collaborations with co-authors in my field.”

Feature | 09/23/2016

Job Search for Economics Majors- Part 1 of 2

Part 1 of two articles on starting the career search as an Economics major, written by Professor Bill Conerly.

Feature | 11/17/2017

UVA alumnus and Economics major, Noah Deich, explores carbon removal through negative emissions

Feature | 08/12/2016

What College Can Teach the Aspiring Entrepreneur

How do you use college to learn how to be an entrepreneur? For the student looking to launch a company after graduation, the answers to the typical questions—where do you go to school, http://online.wsj.com/articles/what-college-can-teach-the-aspiring-entrepreneur-1414965300

Feature | 10/03/2016

ECO NEWSLETTER 10.3.16

This newsletter from the ECO includes jobs and internships for economics majors, events, and workshops!

Feature | 02/14/2017

ARTICLE- ARE YOU A NATURAL INNOVATOR

"I am often engaged to speak about innovation and strategy… not in an academic sort of way, people want to know how I took an idea and turned it into reality. One thing (unfortunately) that we do know is that most start-up businesses never reach the heights that match the dreams of the founders…yet others are a run-away successes. I’m not yet putting my enterprises in the category of ‘runaway’ successes – but we are managing to serve many customers, grow, and have a good time while we are doing it. So, we are getting something right."-Naomi Simson

 

Click here to read the rest of the article

Feature | 08/12/2016

What Can I Do with an Economics Major?

Wondering what you can do with a major in Economics?  Find out here!

Feature | 11/01/2018

MarketWatch: Why Oil Prices are Plunging...

Why oil prices are plunging despite U.S. sanctions on Iran’s energy sector

The oil market has had nearly six months to assess the possible effect of U.S. sanctions on Iranian oil exports. Surprisingly, the prospect of significantly tighter global supplies has resulted in lower prices.

President Donald Trump announced on May 8 that he would end the participation of the United States in the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, a 2015 pact aimed at curbing Iran’s nuclear activities, signed by Iran, the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council, and the European Union.

Read more...https://www.marketwatch.com/story/why-oil-prices-are-plunging-despite-us...\

 

Read more 

 

Feature | 11/07/2016

ECO NEWSLETTER 11.6.16

Quick Job Search Tips and Just a Few Events!

Feature | 09/17/2018

4 Common Interview Questions - Including the Tough Ones!

Interview invitations should really come with a warning: Strong feelings of excitement changing suddenly into dread are imminent upon receiving this invitation. 

Career counselors (and yes, I’m guilty of this, too) will frequently say, “Oh, it’s a two-way street. You’re interviewing them as much as they’re interviewing you.” And while that is partially true—you should definitely use the interview as a way to gauge whether or not you want to work for a company—there is still a power imbalance. Ultimately, the hiring manager will get to decide first whether you’ll get an offer. So, it’s understandable to be nervous. 

But fear not! With a little preparation, you’ll know exactly what to say to impress. To get you started, here are four tricky, but common, interview questions and how to tackle them....Click here for more: https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-common-interview-questions-and-4-perfec...

 

Feature | 01/09/2017

US News: Ways to Improve Your Rhetoric for Interviews

Tips on how to more persuasively communicate your skills and accomplishments to impress interviewers: http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/articles/2016-11-16/4-ways-to-improve-your-interviewing-success

Feature | 08/12/2016

The Reality of Student Debt is Different from the Cliches

Matt Chingos and Beth Akers from The Brookings Institution, who participated in an Econmics Career Office panel in 2013, have published their piece about student debt.  You may find the piece in its entirety here.

Feature | 10/29/2018

Professor Charlie Holt received this year's Thomas Jefferson Award for Scholarship- the highest honor given to members of the UVA Community

Feature | 05/17/2018

Professor Jonathan Colmer discusses his latest research with UVA Today

Feature | 02/09/2018

Econ Alum Alex Turowski Plays with Data for a Living! And He Wants You to Too!

2010 economics alumnus Alex Turowski is the new Partner Success Lead at New Engen in Seattle, Washington. What does this mean? Alex plays with data for a living at New Engen, a digital marketing optimization and design firm.

After building a successful career in Search Engine Optimization with Merkle (formerly RKG) here in Charlottesville, Alex was lured to New Engen in Seattle to lead their Partner Success team. 

The firm boasts solid, fast growth and has become an industry leader with clients such as TUMI, Volt Athletics, and Man Crates and partners such as Shopify.

Alex is hiring an entry level analyst and the posting is on Handshake. If you'd like to reach Alex directly, please write to him at https://www.linkedin.com/in/alex-turowski-3b500647/

New Engen is a performance-driven marketing technology company accelerating customer growth through digital marketing optimization. By integrating proprietary software with teams of experienced marketers and data scientists, New Engen helps clients solve some of their most complex digital marketing challenges. The company’s powerful technology solution ignites growth at companies across industries, geographies and maturity. New Engen is headquartered in Seattle with offices in Dallas, New York, San Francisco and Washington, DC.

www.newengen.com

Feature | 06/20/2018

Melissa Moore Elected VP of Graduate School of Arts & Sciences Council

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Council (GSASC) represents the interests of graduate students at University of Virginia. As GSASC’s Vice President of Administration, 4th year Economics PhD student Melissa Moore helps run the council and organize events for GSASC. Melissa was elected to the Vice President position this May, after serving for a year as the Initiatives Committee Co-Chair. In that position, Melissa led a review of funding issues affecting graduate students at UVA and helped kick-start a GSASC Research Grant program. In Spring 2018, the GSASC Research Grant provided grants of up to $1,000 for ten students in the graduate school, including Economics student Emily Cook. Graduate students will continue to have the opportunity to apply for the grants every semester.  When asked why she, as a busy graduate student, would seek out this additional responsibility, Melissa explains that “serving on GSASC has helped me become connected to the university community. I’ve been able to meet graduate students from other departments and learn more about the administration of a research institution. I think it’s important for graduate students to have a voice at the university and I’m happy to contribute my time towards furthering that goal.”

Feature | 10/10/2016

ECO NEWSLETTER 10.10.16

Resources Galore! Upcoming Events!

Feature | 04/05/2018

ARTICLE - TIPS FOR NETWORKING AS AN INTROVERT

"So… being an introvert does NOT mean you don’t have social skills. As career development folks, we all know this, right? Right. However, it does mean that for many of us, being around lots of people at one time can be draining. I am what you might consider an “expressive” introvert, so I am often mistaken as an extrovert." -Tiffany I. Waddell

 

Click here to read the rest of the article.

Feature | 04/28/2017

A proposal that would help unemployed with income support and student financial aid.

"The author proposes an Enrollment for Employment and Earnings policy that would make income support and student financial aid available to unemployment insurance recipients, replacing Pell Grants and tuition tax credits for these individuals. Receipt of assistance would be conditional on satisfactory progress as well as completion of an enrollment choice module and academic and financial planning module, ensuring that students have the baseline skills to complete the program and the prospect of employment upon completion. In addition, states would develop a decision support tool to provide adult potential students with a clear comparison of costs, program duration, completion rates, and expected labor market outcomes associated with different postsecondary choices. Finally, federal support for postsecondary institutions would increase during recessions to meet rising demand."

Feature | 10/11/2016

ECON Alum: Yingqi Liu, Class of '16

1. Why did you choose to study economics?

Coming into UVa, I knew that I wanted to major in something that is theory-based and can give me solid quantitative trainings. Economics major offers me these, and I can also apply theories that I have learned in class to explain phenomenon in my daily life.

2. What courses/professors have been the most influential and why?

I enjoyed taking many classes, including Industrial Organization with Professor Mills and Econometrics with Professor Michener. If I had to pick, perhaps Antitrust Policy with Professor Elzinga would be one of the most influential courses. In class, we examined the progression of court rulings of interesting antitrust issues over time, some of which took place during the timeframe of the class. I got a much better understanding of economic consulting, and applied for my current job.

3. Over the summer you worked as an intern. In your own words, what did you do in this role? How was it related to your major/how did you use what you've learned in the department to secure this role and on the job?

I interned at a wealth management firm over the summer. It was mainly a client-facing role with access to the most up-to-date market research data. I got to work with a wonderful team and learned more about the financial industry. The analytical training in the Econ Department prepared me well for this role.

4. What career goals do you have for your future?  (immediate/long-term)

I will work for Cornerstone Research after graduation. After a few years, I plan to attend graduate school (MBA or JD).

5. If the ECO has helped in your experience at U.Va., kindly share how/why.

The ECO has been an extremely valuable resource in every stage of my career exploration. By attending numerous career panels, I got to see a wide variety of industries and met many distinguished Econ alumni. I also enjoyed speaking with Jen, who always provided me with constructive feedback and steered me toward the right direction.

6. What is a fun fact about you?

I graduated from a high school in Green Bay, Wisconsin. I did go to Packers games and I do own a Packers jersey, but I have never worn a cheese hat.

Feature | 08/12/2016

A Different Recruitment Method

Large companies are hiring recruits first then assigning a job role to them later. Review the insightful comments at the bottom of the articles.

Feature | 09/06/2018

Devaki Ghose and Moogdho Mahzab Present at Young Economist Symposium (YES)

In August 2018, Devaki Ghose and Moogdho Mahzab presented their research at the prestigious Young Economist Symposium (YES) held at New York University. YES is an annual student-run conference for Economics PhD students sponsored by NYU, Columbia, U Penn, Princeton and Yale. This year the conference received around 150 papers, and about 40 of these--written by students from Harvard, Princeton, Chicago, Oxford and other top Economics schools--were selected to be presented at the conference, providing the presenters the opportunity to reveive feedback from peers with diverse background and concentrations. Devaki Ghose presented her paper, “Trade and the changing pattern of education: Empirical evidence from India,” and discussed a paper presented by a student from Columbia University. Moogdho Mahzab presented his paper, “Dishonest politicians and public goods provisions,” and discussed a paper presented by a student from Cornell University. Both were members of the development panel.

Feature | 11/20/2017

ARTICLE - 12 CRUCIAL TIPS TO DESIGNING SMARTPHONE QUALITATIVE THAT GETS GREAT INSIGHT

"Over the Shoulder has been helping put smartphone-based qualitative into the toolkit of qualitative researchers and insight seekers for almost nine years now. We’re often asked by clients to list the biggest tips and “watch-outs” that smartphone qual practitioners should bear in mind to make their jobs easier and their deliverables to clients more valuable." - Ross McLean

Click here to read the rest of the article. 

Feature | 09/09/2016

Timely and adequate monsoons cannot end the woes of farmers, by Professor Sheetal Sekhri

"Groundwater reserves in India are a vital resource that support livelihood for around 53 million Indians and provide drinking water to around 80% of the rural population . It is vital for the country’s food and drinking water security."- Professor Sheetal Sehkri

See full article here.

Feature | 11/28/2018

Summary of research presented at the semiannual Richmond Fed-UVA Research Workshop

Feature | 09/11/2018

Welcome to Our New Graduate Students

The UVA Department of Economics is delighted to welcome its incoming class of graduate students. The cohort of 20 students is equally divided with regards to gender. Fifteen of the 22 are international students, 9 of whom earned degrees at other universities in the U.S. Each student in the cohort has at least one previous degree in economics, if not two, and several had a second undergraduate major in math or statistics. They bring with them a wide range of real world experience: one student is completing a position as a Fulbright Scholar at the Free Market Foundation of South Africa; several have completed internships with places such as the Korea Economic Research Institute,  the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and the Yale School of Management; and others have held professional positions--as economists, research assistants, or analysts--at organizations such as the Bank of Korea, the University of Wisconsin Hospital Emergency Medicine Research Group, the DC Federal Reserve Board, and the NERA Economic Consulting firm.

Feature | 04/19/2016

Women in Economics

Economics Conference at UVA Promotes Opportunities for Women in the Field

Lexi Schubert (Econ & Cog Sci, Class of '17) also had this to say about the conference: "Personally, it was incredibly inspiring to meet economists like Sandy Black and Claudia Goldin. They are incredible role models and reinforced my own aspirations to go into academia. The conference also reinforced the idea that it is important to provide students with more information on what economics can be about. Often economics is perceived as an alternative business major. However, it is much more than that. A large part of the "economic training" is about giving students neat tools for solving problems. Those can be used in business, but also far beyond, into fields like education, development, health, public policy, etc. Making the information about ample opportunities as an econ major available to incoming students - especially women - is something that the Economics Club at UVA will look into now. Also, peer-led programs, like the Department's Undergraduate Teaching Fellowship or the Econ Club's Tutoring Program, play a crucial role in providing students with that kind of information from bottom-up instead of top-down."

Feature | 09/18/2018

UVA economist Edgar Olsen and colleagues find discrepancies in rental prices for black and white Americans

Feature | 10/11/2016

ECON Alum: Emily Snow, Class of '16

1. Why did you choose to study economics? 

A month into my first semester, Professor Elzinga gave a lecture in ECON 201 that changed the course of my college trajectory. The topic—rational consumer behavior—was neither inspiring nor profound, but the lesson stuck. I found myself measuring the costs of a good in terms of its next best alternative, ignoring sunk costs when I made a decision, and seeing applications of economics everywhere. Drawn to this “economic way of thinking” during my first months of school, I attended my professors’ office hours, participated in behavioral experiments in the VEcon Lab, and even went water-skiing with Professor Elzinga. As I pursued economics further in subsequent semesters, I was struck by its systematic explanations for the world around me—everything from business strategies to Congressional voting procedures to income inequality. I was fascinated by these questions and the way that economics answered them, and there was no turning back! 

2. What courses/ professors have been particularly influential and why? 

This question is a tough one, because there have been so many! I'm grateful to Mr. Elzinga for his wise counsel, steadfast mentorship, and the way that he constantly challenges me. His ECON 201 class first drew me to the subject, and since then I've had the pleasure of learning from him in his Antitrust seminar and through an independent study on the intersection of economic thought and Christian theology. I'm grateful to Mr. Coppock for his encouragement and natural gift for relating to students. His Public Choice seminar was incredibly interesting and stimulating, and it remains by favorite class to date. I'm grateful to Mr. Holt for his patience, kindness, and willingness to invest in my academic potential. Learning from his expertise in experimental economics has been a true privilege. And the list goes on! I'm grateful to Mr. Olsen for guiding me through my first research project, to Mr. Burton for connecting me wonderful people and opportunities in the Department, to Ms. Turner for her amazing dedication to her students' flourishing, and to many others who have invested in me. 

3. What makes the economics department special? 

As my previous answer demonstrates, the faculty in the economics department have made all the difference to me. They create an atmosphere in which freedom of inquiry flourishes and opportunities abound. During my time in the department, I've particularly enjoyed the opportunity to conduct research. Last year, I completed an independent study in which I used Stata to estimate the efficiency gains of housing vouchers as opposed to public housing. Additionally, I work as a Research Assistant in the VEcon Lab, exploring ways that human behavior either aligns with or deviates from economic theory. In addition to these pursuits, I've also gained immense value from the opportunity to serve as a Teaching Assistant in introductory economics courses. Teaching is a great responsibility and privilege, and helping my students grasp the discipline’s most fundamental principles reminds me of why I fell in love with economics in the first place.

4. How did you spend your summer between third and fourth year? (This language has been changed. Former question asked “How did you spend last summer?” Or, we may mention in the heading that these responses were collected while you were a student and now you are an Associate with BCG.)

I had a fantastic summer interning for BCG in their DC office. My role as a Summer Associate involved collaborating with my case team to strategically simplify the organizational structure of a large tech firm. Day to day, I spent good deal of my time building models on Excel, creating Powerpoint decks for client presentations, and performing data analysis with my team. At the most basic level, my task was to solve problems, and both the content of the work and the atmosphere of the office made my job both stimulating and sustainable. I have no doubt that the experiences the Economics Department has provided me differentiated me as a job candidate, and Jen Jones and the ECO office were enormously valuable to me as I navigated the job recruitment process. Furthermore, once I began my internship, it became abundantly clear that the critical thinking that I learn through my economics coursework would help me succeed in the Associate role. I am looking forward to returning to BCG as a full-time Associate next year. 

5. What is the most interesting thing you've done in the Department?

Serving as one of the first undergraduate Teaching Assistant for introductory economics courses has been and continues to be an incredible privilege and learning opportunity. Standing in front of a classroom twice each week, I’ve learned to present economics concepts in creative ways. I’ve learned to establish credibility by coming prepared for class and by speaking with confidence. I’ve learned to establish approachability by adding lighthearted elements to my lessons and being transparent about any mistakes I make. Working one-on-one with my students, I’ve learned the joys of helping others succeed. I’ve learned to help my students work out practice problems themselves, rather than just listen to me explain them. I’ve learned to exhibit patience and encouragement in the face of my students’ frustration and disappointment, particularly after midterms. 

As a returning TA this year, my goal is been to use these lessons to both improve upon my teaching and to be a leader among new undergraduate TAs. I seek to be a role model by putting my students’ needs above my own. Whether it means putting extra effort into planning interactive lessons, sacrificing time to meet outside of my office hours, or simply demonstrating to my students how much I care about their success, my role as a Teaching Assistant continues to be my most meaningful University involvement. 

Feature | 12/07/2018

Alumni Spotlight: David Neuman

Alumni Spotlight: DAVID NEUMAN, Principal at Trammel Crow Company

Why econ? Economics is a great way to learn the driving forces behind business and the economy. It teaches you the fundamental building blocks for markets and the financial system and a logical way to analyze problems and situations. I graduated from UVA with my economics degree in 1999.

 I now work as the Principal at the Trammell Crow Company. My job is to create value developing commercial real estate projects in the MidAtlantic region for my company’s stakeholders- those are the employees, tenants, residents, municipalities and communities in which we develop projects. I spend much of my time analyzing the relationship of risk and reward for specific development projects and, therefore, spend significant time quantifying and qualifying inherent risks of a project. 

Which economics course was influential and why?
They were all influential! Perhaps the most interesting and memorable, which may be surprising to some, was American Economic History because it gave real examples of the causes of economics forces at motion and what happened in America when those forces dominated the economy (e.g., the Depression, inflation). Economic cycles are inevitable and learning from the past is the best way to prepare for future cycles.

Some advice for current students?  

  • Don’t stress about formulas, small facts or trying to memorize things- focus on understanding the concepts. If you focus on the concepts and remember those concepts, that is how you change your way of thinking and become a smarter person. 
  • When nearing graduation, it’s easy for students to fall into a trap of what they feel they “should do”, such as traditional fields like consulting or banking, however, if that student doesn’t enjoy that field, then how can one have a long, fruitful career doing it? Further, perhaps a student’s core strengths don’t favor that field. Therefore, finding a career path that’s enjoyable and values that student’s strengths is essential.
  • I got C’s in both ECON 201 & 202! So, keep at it and keep positive!  

Feature | 06/06/2018

Kent Merritt, UVA alumnus and economics major, profiled in UVA Today article

Feature | 09/12/2018

Prospective Economics major finds a way for UVA athletes to earn money

Feature | 04/21/2017

Prof Eric Chyn wins Dissertation Prize from HCEO!

"The Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group is pleased to announce the winner of its first-ever dissertation prize, Eric Chyn. He submitted the dissertation “Moved to Opportunity: The Long-Run Effect of Public Housing Demolition on Labor Market Outcomes of Children.”

Feature | 09/25/2018

The Secret to Standing out in Interviews Is Almost Too Obvious

Impressing a stranger, standing out from the competition, earning an offer—these are all challenges, even for an experienced professional who should be a perfect fit.

Why?

Because the higher up you climb on the ladder, the more you’re competing against candidates with similar impressive experiences and qualifications.

As a CEO and interviewer for many years, I’ve met so many great people I ended up passing on.

So, your next question is probably, “Well, then how do I stand out?”

Here’s the big secret that has nothing to do with your resume bullet points: Your strongest selling point, your best competitive edge, is yourself. Truly—no one can copy that.

How do you show who you are over the course of a job interview? Try the following approaches:

 

1. Knock “Tell Me About Yourself” Out of the Park

I ask this question at the beginning of every interview (and so do many, many other people in charge of hiring). Luckily for you, the typical response is generic and long—meaning you have the opportunity here to make yourself memorable.

Consider and practice your response before entering the room. Think of it like a book’s back-cover synopsis: You’re trying to excite and encourage the interviewer. You want her to want to learn more about you—aim to make him or her curious. (Bonus: Include something that isn’t on your resume because the element of surprise can spark additional curiosity.)

If you’re not specifically asked “Tell me about yourself” during the interview, be proactive and find a way to share your answer during the conversation.

 

Continue here: https://www.themuse.com/advice/this-secret-to-standing-out-in-interviews...

 

Feature | 08/12/2016

MacroDigest

Check out MacroDigest.com, a new tool created by students from the London School of Economics to follow systemically important conversations and events. Students felt overwhelmed when trying to access the topics, debates, and current events in the global economy due to the thousands of voices in the blogosphere and news continuously posting and updating. Thus, the creation of MacroDigest. Macrodigest clusters information and analysis on everything moving the global economy.  Students will get a lot out of the home page because it provides a simple yet comprehensive look on both breaking and trending systemically important news while showcasing more nuanced debates happening within the economics world.
 
See "Job Search Resources for Economics Majors" for a more complete list of helpful sources, institutes, and databases.

Feature | 12/28/2017

Lee Coppock receives UVa's prestigious 2018 Alumni Association Distinguished Professor Award

Feature | 12/05/2018

New research from UVA Professor Amalia Miller and her colleagues at Virginia Tech and Tulane University shows that attending elite schools has different effects on male and female students

Photo by Dan Addison, University Communications

Feature | 01/26/2017

ECO Newsletter 1.26.17

Return from Winter Break Edition

 


 

 

Feature | 07/12/2018

10 Ways to Get the Most out of Your Summer Internship

By CAROLINE CENIZA-LEVINE 

June 8, 2016

A summer internship can be a great way to build your future in the adult workforce – or it can be a big disappointment. Are you sitting around with your fellow interns, swapping jokes because you have little do? This temporary gig is supposed to be more than a paycheck. The whole point of it is to further your education.

You have more to say about how your internship goes than you think. If you aren’t gaining the skills and connections you need, talk to your boss about how to make your experience better. Or even if you are busy, and realize you don’t like this occupation, there are lessons to be learned. An internship is too valuable to waste.

You haven’t landed an internship yet? The good news is that companies are still hiring (and check out these last-minute suggestions to increase your job leads). If you have locked down an internship, make the most of it by following these 10 tips:

1. Don’t put up with a do-nothing internship. Horror stories abound about interns sidelined into indolent, clock-watching existences. Or relegated to mindless tasks like fetching coffee or cleaning up the stockroom. Sure, you can’t expect to be plotting corporate strategy as a 20-year-old, two-month temp. But you should politely keep after your boss to make the most of you.

Your manager may not know how quickly or effectively you work, so don’t be alarmed if you’re not given much to do at first. Let your manager know you’re available to do more. Ask for suggestions on how you can learn more about the company and industry. Perhaps there are old company reports you can review. Showing initiative to learn and remain productive will endear you to your boss.

2. Convert your internship into a full-time position. This means doing a great job with the responsibilities given to you right now. Get regular feedback from your manager so you know you’re meeting expectations. If there’s a formal evaluation form, get a copy in advance so you can keep track of what your objectives should be. Ask the human resources department for the official process to be considered for extended employment. You don’t want to miss any steps or deadlines.

3. Get a professional reference (or two). Stay close to your manager so you can get a strong professional reference from him or her. Your internship program may not lead to another job there, but a strong reference can set you up for one elsewhere. Also ask for a reference from others you helped. For example, if you interned in marketing, you may have closely supported the salespeople. Toward the end of your internship, collect their personal contact information, in case they leave the firm by the time you need the references.

4. Identify your valuable strengths. Internships also are voyages of self-discovery. Sometimes skills that come naturally are ones you overlook, and it’s helpful to have others pinpoint them for you. If your internship doesn’t have an official evaluation form, ask for this feedback. This provides you with good talking points when you meet future employers.

5. Identify your weaknesses. Sometimes, managers hesitate to give criticism. Soften the request for a candid critique by asking how to improve for your next role. Not knowing your weak points can hinder you: You won’t know what you need to correct, or whether the job is right for you.

Perhaps you love working in a law firm but aren’t attentive to detail. As an attorney, you will need to be meticulous about the small things, so you need to focus on them in the future. Or your brash personality may not be the right fit for a career in a buttoned-down corporate climate, and nothing will change that. Such self-knowledge will benefit you well going forward.

6. Develop new skills. If your internship offers training workshops or mentor pairings or any other skills-building endeavors, make sure you take advantage of these. Find out the calendar in advance, and give your manager plenty of notice, plus a game plan for how you will make up the work if the extra training interferes with your duties.

7. Broaden your network. Gaining skills isn’t the whole story with an internship. Getting to know people who may help you later is a big goal. Even if no organized networking forums exist, being in the workplace each day means you are meeting new folks constantly. Take your lunch breaks with different co-workers over the summer. Ask your manager for introductions. Attend any company-sponsored events open to you.

This goes for full-time employees and fellow interns alike. Your peers are a great resource because you have a shared experience. Introduce your immediate colleagues to your fellow interns, and ask peers to do the same for you. If you got your internship through a larger organization, keep in touch with its interns outside your company, too.

8. Add new accomplishments to your resume. Note what you’re learning and doing on your resume while it’s fresh in your mind. What technical and computer skills are you using? What types of analysis are you doing? What tangible results have you achieved?

9. Strengthen your online profile. In addition to your resume, update your LinkedIn profile. A word of warning: Be careful about sharing your internship experience on social media. Don’t reveal confidential information – like that research you’re doing for an initiative that is not yet public. Do not share business goals or insights. Furthermore, keep your tone professional and positive. Trashing your boss on the Web, where everyone can read it, including the boss, could come back to harm you.

10. Learn from a bad experience. Not all internships are nirvana. If you don’t like yours, figure out why. This gives you a clearer picture about what you don’t want in your adult career. Is it the day-to-day work? Is it the people? The pace? The growth prospects? The industry or subject matter? Bad experiences are instructive. Remember: You take an internship to learn, about what a job is like and what you are like.

Feature | 04/01/2017

ARTICLE - HOW TO TURN YOUR INTERNSHIP INTO A FULL-TIME JOB

Click here to read the rest of the article. 

Feature | 08/09/2014

ARTICLE- 30 SMART ANSWERS TO TOUGH INTERVIEW QUESTIONS

"Tough interview questions are supposed to challenge job candidates and make them think on their feet.

This could make the typical job interview "the most harrowing forty-five minutes of your life," writes Vicky Oliver in her book "301 Smart Answers to Tough Interview Questions."

But you can be prepared ahead of time. We've compiled some of the toughest interview questions from Oliver's book — and how to answer them."-Vivian Giang and Alexandra Mondalek

 

Click here to read the rest of the article.

Feature | 11/27/2018

How A.I. May Affect Your Internship and Job Search

This article covers how AI may affect your internship and job search, and how you may be able to influence this by managing your electronic footprint and social media presence.

Secondly, the companies listed are potential employers for our students. Tip: Consider organizations that you read about, especially those that are doing work that interests you, as employment possibilities.

Wanted: The ‘perfect babysitter.’ Must pass AI scan for respect and attitude.

By Drew Harwell

When Jessie Battaglia started looking for a new babysitter for her 1-year-old son, she wanted more information than she could get from a criminal-background check, parent comments and a face-to-face interview.

So she turned to Predictim, an online service that uses “advanced artificial intelligence” to assess a babysitter’s personality, and aimed its scanners at one candidate’s thousands of Facebook, Twitter and Instagram posts.

The system offered an automated “risk rating” of the 24-year-old woman, saying she was at a “very low risk” of being a drug abuser. But it gave a slightly higher risk assessment — a 2 out of 5 — for bullying, harassment, being “disrespectful” and having a “bad attitude.”

The system didn’t explain why it had made that decision. But Battaglia, who had believed the sitter was trustworthy, suddenly felt pangs of doubt.

“Social media shows a person’s character,” said Battaglia, 29, who lives outside Los Angeles. “So why did she come in at a 2 and not a 1?”

Predictim is offering parents the same playbook that dozens of other tech firms are selling to employers around the world: artificial-intelligence systems that analyze a person’s speech, facial expressions and online history with promises of revealing the hidden aspects of their private lives.

The technology is reshaping how some companies approach recruiting, hiring and reviewing workers, offering employers an unrivaled look at job candidates through a new wave of invasive psychological assessment and surveillance.

The tech firm Fama says it uses AI to police workers' social media for “toxic behavior” and alert their bosses. And the recruitment-technology firm HireVue, which works with companies such as Geico, Hilton and Unilever, offers a system that automatically analyzes applicants' tone, word choice and facial movements during video interviews to predict their skill and demeanor on the job. (Candidates are encouraged to smile for best results.)

Read more

Feature | 08/12/2015

Jerome Meyinsse: Economics Major and Basketball player

"When former University of Virginia basketball player Jerome Meyinsse returns to Grounds, he always makes two stops:John Paul Jones Arena, home of the men’s basketball team, and Monroe Hall, home of the economics department.

Meyinsse returned again this summer to work out with the current Cavaliers and share wisdom gleaned from five seasons in South America’s professional basketball leagues, where he plays for Brazil’s Flamengo club. Current players would do well to listen – since joining the club two years ago, Meyinsse has enjoyed two national championships, with a third in sight.

“We really enjoy having Jerome back during the summer to work out with our team,” U.Va. head coach Tony Bennett said. “He challenges our post players with his size, skill and competiveness. Jerome has worked hard to become a professional basketball player and was an excellent student at U.Va. We’re certainly proud of what he has accomplished since he graduated.”

At U.Va., the 6-foot-9 Meyinsse was known for his contributions at center, especially during his final season – Bennett’s first – in 2010. He was also known as one of the most outstanding students the program had seen, majoring in economics and minoring in math." (Caroline Newman)

See the full interview here.

Feature | 08/22/2016

PhD Alum, Jessica Howell: Exploring matching between students and Colleges

A new book explores the challenge of helping more students succeed at a broader range of institutions. Econ Phd Alum, Jessica Howell, discusses this book and it's research in an interview with the Chronicle of Higher Education. Read the full article here.

Feature | 08/12/2016

Working Overseas

This article offers terrific advice about searching for jobs and internships overseas.

When reading the “Consider the Possibilities” section, keep in mind that many countries abroad have U.Va. alumni chapters, which you may access here.  The ECO is certain that alumni who manage these clubs would be amenable to speaking with you about your questions and ideas.

Feature | 11/01/2018

Diego Legal-Cañisá at the Becker-Friedman Institute's Macro Financial Modeling Summer Session

The Macro Financial Modeling (MFM) Summer Session, organized by the University of Chicago's Becker-Friedman Institute, is designed for early-career professionals and doctoral students in economics and related fields who are interested in developing enhanced macroeconomic models with linkages to the financial sector. Diego Legal-Cañisá, who participated in the 2018 Session,  reports that it was "an excellent opportunity to receive feedback on my research from a wide range of top scholars with similar research interests. I did a poster presentation which allowed me to practice explaining my research and preliminary results and answering questions clearly and concisely. I received insightful comments and recommendations, such as suggestions of additional exercises I could perform and connections I could make to other related areas. In addition, the MFM was a great opportunity to learn more about frontier research in macro-finance from top scholars and to listen to inspiring keynote talks by Lars Hansen, Christopher Sims, Andrew W. Lo, and Harald Uhlig, to name a few. Last but not least, it was a great opportunity to exchange experiences about academic life with colleagues and gather resources pertaining to conferences and internship opportunities, job market tips, and other useful resources that will help me develop as a researcher."

Feature | 08/30/2018

What to Wear: Dressing for the Job Search

Feature | 09/23/2016

Professor Ana Fostel: Using Mathematical Models to Understand Global Markets

"Focusing on the intersection of macroeconomics and finance, Fostel employs models that focus on the role of debt in asset pricing to understand investment, growth, default and contagion." (Lorenzo Perez). Learn more about Professor Ana Fostel's research here.

Professor Ana Fostel has taught Global Financial Markets, which should be offered in Spring 2017 (ECON 4365).

Feature | 12/14/2015

The “New" Renaissance Man

Learn about what tech firms are looking for these days from Prof. Nekipelov (ECON 4720).

Feature | 10/05/2018

Ga Young Ko Wins Tipton Snavely Award for Outstanding Summer Research

Ga Young Ko, a 3rd year PhD student, won a Tipton Snavely Award for Outstanding Summer Research (an honor shared with Joaquin Saldain). She summarizes her paper, titled The Role of Rating System and Hiring Biases in Freelance Auction Platforms, as follows: "A freelance auction platform is a website that matches buyers of services with sellers using an auction mechanism. Sellers differ in terms of their observed demographics (e.g., gender, race, etc.) and unobserved quality. Buyers on the platform may use demographic information as cues to evaluate quality. If these characteristics are correlated, then observing demographics allows buyers to make informed task-specific hiring decisions. But these characteristics may also induce intrinsic racial or gender-based hiring biases. I develop and estimate a model of a sequential first-price auction with beauty contest and endogenous entry. I use an extensive new data-set from a freelance platform. The data-set includes price offers, assignments, and seller characteristics, where machine learning techniques are employed to infer race and gender. Through various counterfactual analyses I will determine the role of information about sellers on the market outcome and also quantify the efficiency of the freelance system."

Feature | 11/27/2018

Amzad Hossain Wins Global Infectious Disease Fellowship

Amzad Hossain was one of 4 graduate students recently awarded a GIDI iGrant by UVA's Global Infectious Diseases Institute, which supports faculty and graduate student research aimed at reducing the impact of infectious diseases around the globe. He will use the fellowship to further his research on mother and child mortality in Bangladesh. More specifically, Amzad says that he will collaborate with Moogdho Mahzab (a 4th year Economics PhD student) "to examine the effects of community-based health clinics on child health outcomes such as take-up of vaccines to prevent infectious diseases and neo-natal mortality. The government of Bangladesh in 1998 introduced a policy to establish 13,500 community clinics spread all over the country. Each community clinic (CC) was to provide various services including maternal & neonatal health care services for around 6,000 people. We will exploit the variation in the policy with regard to community clinics--its introduction, withdrawal and subsequent reintegration--to identify the effects of community clinics on health outcomes. As the search for effective ways to improve health outcome continues, our findings can be of great relevance for stakeholders and policy makers."

Feature | 01/10/2017

ECO NEWSLETTER 1.10.17

Data Can Be Romantic! Volunteering: Good for your Heart!

Feature | 08/24/2017

ECON Grads at the 6th Lindau meeting on Economic Sciences

Graduate student Devaki Ghose was selected among young economists through a combination of written application and interviews to be a panelist alongside Eric Maskin (Nobel Laureate, Economics) and Howard Yana Shapiro (Chief Agricultural Scientist, Mars Incorporated) to discuss economic inequality in a globalized world on August 24th.

 

The panelists first discussed their views on economic inequality, solutions and then the forum was open to questions from the audience. The following articles cover the event-

http://www.lindau-nobel.org/blog-the-puzzle-of-global-inequality/

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/fighting-economic-inequality-through-food-supply-chain-shapiro

http://blog.worldagroforestry.org/index.php/2017/08/28/fighting-economic-inequality-through-the-food-supply-chain/

 

ECONGrads Cailin Slattery and Ia Vardishvilli also participated in the conference.

Ia presenting her work to laureates (you can see Pissardes in the picture).

Cailin with the other NSF sponsored students at a lunch with two laureates (standing next to Prescott).

Feature | 01/07/2018

Jennifer Doleac reviews research that finds increasing access to substance abuse and mental health treatment reduces violence and property crime

Feature | 02/17/2017

Professor James Harrigan: Economic Inequality in the U.S.

 How Bad Is It, and Why Is It Growing?

"University of Virginia economics professor James Harrigan is using more than 35 years of data to study economic inequality in the United States, seeking explanations and solutions for the rapidly widening chasm between the very rich and nearly everyone else.

His undergraduate course, “Economic Inequality,” helps students understand the nuances of the contentious topic, which found its way to the heart of national conversation in the recent presidential election."

Feature | 10/10/2016

ECON Alum: Diane Cherry, Class of '89

At the time of the production of this profile, Ms. Cherry worked as the Environments Policy Manager at the Institute of Emerging Issues. Learn more about Ms. Cherry's current position here: http://www.energync.org/page/bio_diane_C/Diane-Cherry.htm

Why study economics?

Economics is one of the most important topics that explain everyday life.  It tells us why consumers and firms behave the way they do and how they relate to each other and to institutions such as the government. As two examples -- economics explains how firms react to different types of regulation and how the Federal Reserve’s monetary policies impact the interest rates consumers face when they go to finance the purchase of their house. Economics can be applied to all kinds of sectors such as healthcare, the environment and education. In nearly every issue or discussion people want to know who is impacted and how much something costs.  All of that requires an understanding of economics. More broadly, economics teaches analytical and problem solving skills that employers continually search for in their employees.

2. What course/professor was influential and why?

Dr. Ed Olsen was the most influential professor I had when I was at UVA.  I was part of the economics distinguished majors program and spent my fourth year doing a research paper on how announcements of money supply affect interest rates and exchange rates.  I really enjoyed the research aspect of the work and wanted to continue as a research assistant in some capacity after I graduated.  Dr. Olsen provided me the names and contacts of several organizations in Washington, D.C. that hire research assistants out of college and I was fortunate enough to work for one organization for two and a half years before I went to graduate school.

3. What made the economics department attractive to you/what made it special?  

The economics department was special for a number of reasons.  First, I really enjoyed the distinguished majors program and the small number of students that were part of that group.  We socialized together and studied together and many of us had similar career interests.  Second, I really had a chance to get to know my professors – Dr. Charlie Holt and Dr. Ed Olsen were two of them-- and I have even stayed in touch with them fifteen years later. Third, the department offered a variety of classes in everything from labor economics to public finance and all of these topics explored economics in a different way. There really was something available for anyone and now the department offers even more classes than when I attended UVA.

4. Your job title is Environments Policy Manager. In your own words, what is it that you do and how is your job related to your major?

I am the Environments Policy Manager at the Institute for Emerging Issues, a public policy organization housed at NC State University and founded by former Governor Jim Hunt.  In my job, I work collaboratively with individuals from all sectors and areas of North Carolina to build collective action in energy, infrastructure, transportation and the natural environment. I also teach U.S. Environmental Policy, Written Communication for Public Policy and other courses in the MPA program at NC State University.  Previously, I worked as a senior policy advisor for North Carolina’s environmental director and as a Presidential Management Fellow for the EPA.

The environmental and energy field is very divisive.  Economics plays an important part of the discussion of what the state of North Carolina should do to encourage everything from the development of renewable energy to the deployment of broadband in rural areas of the state.  The other factor that permeates most of the discussions I am part of is the role of the private and the public sector in solving energy and environmental issues. Depending on one’s viewpoint, there should either be a strong role for the government or the outcome should be left to market.  The conversations are interesting and economics inevitably has a big piece of the discussion.

5. What is an interesting project you’ve worked on?

One of the most interesting projects I worked on recently was developing a workshop for about one hundred stakeholders across North Carolina on the implications of the EPA’s Clean Power Plan (CPP) on North Carolina’s future energy footprint.  The CPP’s carbon dioxide standards reflect “the best system of emission reductions” and each state is obliged to develop an individual program for compliance.  This set of regulations serves as a national signal for the end of coal as the backbone of our nation’s energy needs. Meanwhile, the Plan also opens up enormous market opportunities for manufacturers of energy-efficient products and components of renewable energy systems. North Carolina’s manufacturers excel in both of these product sectors.

6. What advice do you have for students about their time in the department in relation to preparing for next steps?

When I was in my third and fourth year I knew I wanted to work for a while before going to graduate school but I didn’t know where or in what field.  I found the professors an amazing resource to talk with about the opportunities available to economics majors.  Dr. Olsen in particular was really helpful and provided me the names of over a dozen organizations that hired research assistants for two or three years.  I interviewed with several before deciding upon Resources for the Future and that job has influenced my entire career trajectory. 

7. What do you know now you wish you had known while you were majoring in economics at U.Va.?  

I wished I had talked with more students who took different career paths following graduation. Economics is a major that leads to a number of careers. I never really considered consulting or law school but that was in part because I never had exposure to students who worked in those fields.  I believe that the best way to find your path going forward is to get exposure to as many people who have different careers.  Each time you learn something you don’t want to do it is a clearer path to finding what you do want to do.

8. Who (or what) has been influential in your career and why?

My graduate degree in public policy from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University was very instrumental toward my career path.  I had an interest in policy issues back in the early 1990s when I left UVA and worked in Washington, D.C. but graduate programs in public policy then were not nearly as prevalent as they are now.  I kind of backed into a public policy career after eliminating a Ph.D. in economics as one of my career options.  My boss at Resources for the Future where I worked as a research assistant had contacts at the Kennedy School of Government and suggested that I apply there for graduate school.

9. What is on the horizon for you/other career goals you have in mind?  

I have really enjoyed teaching public policy courses at NC State University and hope to continue teaching in the indefinite future.  Since I’ve been working about twenty years in public policy it is fun to teach public policy tools to the next generation of professionals.

10. Tell us a fun fact about you.

I really enjoy running and have already completed five half marathons throughout North Carolina.  I don’t think I’ll ever train for a full marathon but running is a great way to relieve stress and ruminate about things that require a lot of thinking.

 

Feature | 08/02/2017

ARTICLE - HOW TO MASTER EFFECTIVE STORYTELLING IN INTERVIEWS

"You feel nervous about your career stories, and the fact that you have to tell stories in interviews drives you bananas. You're not sure whether your stories are even any good. You don't know if what you did was even that special." -Natalie Fisher 

Click here to read the rest of the article

Feature | 02/02/2017

ARTICLE-UNDERSTANDING THE FEDERAL HIRING FREEZE AND ITS IMPACT ON YOUR SEARCH

""For students who may be thinking about federal jobs and wondering how the hiring freeze impacts them, we want to highlight a few key points. The hiring freeze remains in place, with a longer-term plan to reduce the size of the federal workforce due from the Office of Personnel Management and the Office of Management and Budget by the end of April."-Dreama Johnson 

Click here to read the rest of the article 

Feature | 08/12/2016

Delivering the Best First Impression in 30 seconds

Useful tips for making the best first impression in the business world.

Feature | 08/12/2016

A Great Cover Letter can Lead to an Interview

Tips on how to write a cover letter that could attract potential employers.

Note: Consider the source, the hiring norms of the industry and organization you are looking to enter, and also double check with a career advisor if you have any doubt in your mind about advice.

Feature | 08/18/2016

The Impact of Female Law Enforcement

In 2014, Professor Amalia Miller, studied the effects of integrating female law enforcement. See the original paper here.

Feature | 03/28/2018

ARTICLE - MIDDLE MARKET INVESTMENT BANKS

"The deal is the toast of the season globally. But do you know who advised Facebook? The logical answers would be Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, UBS, and DeutscheBank, etc. Surprisingly, it’s a firm called Allen & Company." -Avadhut Nigudkar

Click here to read the rest of the article

Feature | 09/11/2018

Cover Letter Tips

Some would argue that it’s easier to write a novel than it is to craft an effective cover letter opening. In a cover letter, so much hinges on one paragraph: your intro needs to successfully hook the viewer and compel them to keep reading, market you as a brilliant hire right off the bat, and be original enough to make you stand out. And yet, you only have a few lines to achieve all of this, and you know little about the addressee and what appeals to them.

It’s no wonder that the mere mention of the task tends to paralyze job seekers. But we’re here to help you out of your frozen state. Below are our eight tips for writing a cover letter opening that’ll definitely get you noticed.

1. Avoid generic introductions

Whatever you do, don’t open your cover letter with a line like, “I’m writing to apply for the position of [job title], which I saw advertised on [job board name] on [date]”. It’s dull, it’s uninspiring, and every recruiter has already seen it far too many times. Yes, it’s important to cover key details, like the position you’re interested in and the company name, at the start of your letter, but try do so in a more original way. You could even consider putting these basics in the subject line of your email (if you’re applying digitally) or in a “RE:” header (if you’re sending a hard copy) so you can use your introductory element to get straight to the meaty details that’ll win recruiters over.

2. Let your personality shine through

Naturally, you want to come across as a professional, but don’t open your letter in a manner that’s so excessively formal and dry that you sound robotic. Right from the get-go, you should give hiring managers a sense of who you are—after all, the point is to convince them that you’re a person worth meeting. So, use the first person “I”, inject charisma, showcase your quirks (if appropriate), and generally make it clear that there’s a unique human being behind the words.

3. Express enthusiasm

Enthusiasm is a good predictor of a strong work ethic, so recruiters will be looking for signs of it from sentence one. For this reason, you can’t go wrong if you start your letter by communicating your passion for the field and/or your affection for this company, above all others. Just make sure your declaration of love sounds genuine. You could, for example, include an anecdote (more below) that captures your long-standing devotion to the industry or reference a recent development at the company (like a ground-breaking study they just published) that reaffirms your desire to work for them.

4. Tell a story

Stories tend to make a much bigger impression on people than dry facts do. To make your cover letter opening memorable, start with a short narrative that ties into your love for the subject area or relationship with the brand. For instance, maybe you liked the company’s advertising jingle so much as a child that you once performed it in your school’s talent show. Or perhaps you’re so passionate about sport that you used to fall asleep with a football in your hands when you were young. Or maybe there’s a story worth telling around how you first came across the company as a customer. Whatever the tale, tell it as succinctly and authentically as you can, and it should also help you achieve points 2 and 3 above.

5. Be bold (but first, know your audience)

The best way to make your opening paragraph stand out? Do or say something no one else is doing or saying. Of course, getting a little creative with your opening can be a risky move, so first consider the kind of business you’re dealing with, research the company culture, and take note of the tone of voice used in the job ad. If you’re applying for a job at a startup that’s turning tradition on its head, then there’s room for you to be a bit daring and irreverent, to prove that you, too, can think outside the box. If, however, you’re expressing interest in a position at a large corporate company, like a banking firm, and the job posting uses formal language, then it’s probably safer to go the more conventional route.

6. Lead with an impressive skill or accomplishment

If you possess a relevant ability that few others do or have a major career accomplishment under your belt, then absolutely do open your cover letter with a mention of this fact. Details like these set you apart from other candidates, so you want hiring managers to be aware of them from the outset.

7. Name a mutual contact

One sure way to grab attention in your first paragraph is to mention the name of a common acquaintance, especially if this person recommended that you apply for the role. By associating yourself with someone who’s respected at the company, you automatically improve your chances of getting an interview.

8. Keep it short, sharp, and clean

The job of a cover letter is to sell you and your skills to a prospective employer. So, approach your introduction like an advertiser would approach ad copy—keep it concise, get straight to the point, and try to capture readers in as few words as possible. One tight paragraph will do – after all, the whole letter should be no longer than a page. Also make sure that it’s free of spelling and grammatical errors—typos are the enemy of a successful cover letter opening.

Since 2005, LiveCareer has been helping job seekers create resumes and cover letters via its free resume builder and cover letter builder tools. Also available are collections of free, professionally written resume templates and cover letter templates, all of which are organized by industry and job title.

Feature | 09/24/2018

Dan Savelle Presents at EARIE'S Rising Stars Session

Dan Savelle presented his paper, “Discrete Choices with (and without) Ordered Search,” at the 45th Annual Conference of the European Association for Research in Industrial Economics (EARIE) in a Rising Stars Session in Athens, Greece. The Conference consisted of contributed and invited sessions across various IO topics including Search, Platform Economics, Advertising, Auctions, Mechanism Design, Trade and IO, and Financial Markets, with keynote talks by Jakub Kastl, Peter Neary and Xavier Vives. Dan's paper relates two literatures in the field of Industrial Organization, ordered search and classic discrete choice. In IO, the selection choices of a consumer, such as a family looking to buy a house, are often represented by the classic discrete-choice model of decision making, which posits a consumer who receives a match value for each option and selects the option with the highest match value. However, in many markets, consumers may not know their values without first incurring a cost. For example, the family searching for a home incurs costs in terms of time and effort. In this context, the consumer starts with information that can be updated through some costly process like ordered search, a discrete choice model where a consumer selects from a set of products after paying a search cost to learn each product's actual value. Dan proves that in situations where consumers correctly anticipate the choices of firms (e.g prices), ordered search and classic discrete-choice are equivalent models for describing the selections of consumers.

 

Feature | 09/15/2016

A long term study on the impact of GMO crops, co-led by Professor Federico Ciliberto

Professor Federico Ciliberto led a 14 year study on the environmental impact of genetically modified crops on farmworkers, consumers, and the environment. See more here.

Feature | 11/14/2017

ARTICLE - HOW TO TELL IF A JOB WILL BE A GOOD FIT

"Have you ever felt like a fish out of water at a job? 

You don't fit in, you don't feel the vibe, and you know that these aren't your people. Whatever you do, you don't feel welcome, and you can't do anything right. Your co-workers don't understand you. You don't enjoy most of the work itself, and you struggle to figure out how to do things (or who to ask for help). You feel like you're just biding your time until you can get out, and you spend a lot of time planning your escape." -Natalie Fisher

Feature | 09/23/2018

Careers in Marketing Forum

Taking place next Thursday (9/27) and Friday (9/28), the Careers in Marketing forum is a unique opportunity for students to learn from a diverse group of Marketing alum representing many different areas within the industry. We have an impressive line-up this year with 16 alums committed to participate and a keynote with incredible experience, James Quarles, CEO of Strava, formerly of Instagram & Facebook who will be discussing: Marketing at the Intersection of Business and Consumer Needs.

 

For details and to RSVP:

Thursday Kickoff: https://app.joinhandshake.com/events/161935

Friday’s Forum: https://app.joinhandshake.com/events/161938

Feature | 09/25/2018

Make a Powerful Interview Impact! (First Impressions Count!)

Feature | 10/02/2017

ARTICLE - 6 SIMPLE JOB SEARCH TIPS PEOPLE ALWAYS FORGET

"The irony of job search advice: There’s so much available that you don’t have to spend more than four seconds Googling before you land on some nugget of wisdom or another." - Jenny Foss

Click here to read the rest of the article.

Feature | 09/24/2018

Haruka Takayama Hasegawa Recognized for Contributions to VISA Program

Our very own Haruka Takayama Hasegawa was recognized by UVA's Center for American English Language and Culture (CAELC) for her generous contributions to the VISAS program. VISAS partners volunteers with international students, staff, and visiting scholars to foster support for international students and staff as well as cross-cultural learning that benefits all parties. We are not surprised, as Haruka is known within the department for her perpetual good cheer and kindness. The text from the VISAS article is quoted in full below: 

Haruka Takayama Hasegawa is a PhD candidate in Economics from Kyushu, the sourthernmost of the four main islands of Japan. Haruka’s collegiate career began with her undergraduate studies at Japan’s Kobe University where she focused on development economics. After graduating, Haruka worked as a consultant in Tokyo before moving to the U.S. to earn a master’s degree at Boston University. Along the way, she decided to shift her focus to international trade and returned to Tokyo to work in foreign affairs. Here in Charlottesville, Haruka continues her focus on international trade in pursuit of her doctorate. Haruka became involved with VISAS her first year at UVa, in 2015, working with ESL Assistants in her CAELC ESL classes. Haruka quickly developed as a leader and, in 2016, took on the role as a panelist for the “Teaching as a Graduate Student” workshop series that welcomes and helps acclimate new international TAs to the university. Through these efforts, Haruka has used her insight to help many international students overcome the challenges she faced when she was a new international graduate student in the U.S. This year, in addition to continuing her efforts as a panelist, Haruka has become involved with the Language Consultant (LC) program. She meets with her LC, Mae, on a weekly basis to practice English speaking and learn about different aspects of the U.S. and university culture. Hoping to pursue an academic career in the U.S., Haruka truly appreciates everything she can learn from Mae about the U.S. undergraduate student life, from football games and March Madness to academics and everyday activities. We are sincerely grateful and honored to have gotten to know Haruka and to have her as a member of the VISAS family. 

Feature | 10/24/2016

ECO NEWSLETTER 10.24.16

How to Navigate a Career Fair PowerPoint, Events, M.S. in Commerce Info Session, and this week's ECO alumni guest, Jeff Hansen!

Feature | 05/08/2018

In Memoriam: Leland B. Yeager (November 4, 1924 - April 23, 2018)

Leland Yeager died on April 23, 2018 at the age of 93. Yeager was the last of the remarkable group of scholars–including Buchanan, Tullock, Coase, Nutter–that made Virginia political economy. He is best known for his contributions to monetary theory and international monetary economics.  Professor Yeager earned his A.B. from Oberlin College and his M.A. and Ph.D. in economics from Columbia University. Following a brief stint at the University of Maryland, he taught for nearly three decades at the University of Virginia. Yeager finished his career at Auburn University, where he was Ludwig von Mises Distinguished Professor of Economics.

Below are a number of wonderful tributes to Mr. Yeager:

 

Feature | 08/11/2017

Professor John McLaren's research acknowledged in Bloomberg article.

"John McLaren was among the small school of economists worrying that overall gains from trade were smaller than his colleagues suspected—and the local impact much worse."

Photo by Dan Addison, University Communications

Feature | 10/31/2018

Alumni Spotlight: Emily Steinhilber

University of Virginia, Department of Economics

Alumni Spotlight: Emily Steinhilber, Research Associate Professor at Old Dominion University

 

Life at UVA and since graduating:

Emily graduated from the University of Virginia in 2007 with degrees in Economics and History. After UVA, Emily received her doctorate in Law and Masters in Environmental Law and Policy at the Vermont Law School, where she graduated magna cum laude. She has worked in legal clinics and in environmental policy for over a decade.

 

She now works at Old Dominion University as a Research Assistant Professor. She coordinates the Commonwealth Center for Recurrent Flooding Resilience and works with faculty members to ensure their work is useful for policy makers and the public. She works with entrepreneurs and innovators to support new ideas for adapting to flooding.

 

In your own words, what is sustainability?

Effectively using resources to ensure a better result.

 

Emily’s advice for students:

  • Read up on as much literature as you can on the topics that interest you professionally and personally
  • Don’t write anything important on your phone–take pride in your written work
  • Do your research effectively and thoroughly–click on references in papers
  • Ask people to have coffee!
 

Feature | 08/24/2018

Opportunity to Attend Davos and the World Economic Forum!

The Credit Suisse Research Institute (CSRI) Academy Challenge is underway and we didn’t want your candidates to miss out on an outstanding prize:

This year's winner will get the incredible opportunity to take part in the Credit Suisse Event at the 2019 edition of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland where you can engage in discussions on the most pressing global issues with the world's top leaders.

 

The CSRI Academy Challenge is set over 2 stages and open to all university students and recent grads interested in shaping the global agenda.
See all the available prizes here. Enter stage 1  of the Challenge until September 30!

Feature | 06/10/2015

Immigrant Job Creation

"Politicians on both sides of the aisle have raised concerns about immigrants taking American jobs, but one University of Virginia economist makes a compelling case for the opposite effect.

Dubbing immigrants “a shot in the arm” for local economies, economics professor John McLaren found that immigrant workers actually create new local jobs, many of them subsequently filled by American-born employees.

The National Bureau of Economic Research recently circulated the study, which was conducted by McLaren and Gihoon Hong, who earned his Ph.D. in economics from U.Va. in 2010. McLaren and Hong find that each new immigrant generates 1.2 local jobs." (Caroline Newman)

See the full article here.

Feature | 03/28/2017

Top 40 Grad programs: Economics tied for No. 29 overall!

The following Graduate School of Arts & Sciences all ranked in the top 40 programs in their respective disciplines, as measured by U.S. News:

  • English: tied for No. 6 overall, tied for No. 5 in American literature before 1865;
  • Psychology: No. 17 overall;
  • Corcoran Department of History: tied for No. 18 overall, tied for No. 1 in U.S. colonial history;
  • Economics: tied for No. 29 overall;
  • Sociology: tied for No. 32 overall; and
  • Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics: tied for No. 37 overall.

Feature | 08/08/2017

ARTICLE - 5 BEST APPS FOR TIME MANAGEMENT

"These days, we do lots of things online. While this saves us a lot of time, it also demands more focus and concentration on our part. With all the distractions the internet offers, you may want to use some effective time management tools to eliminate them." -Jack Milgram

 

Click here to read the rest of the article. 

Feature | 11/27/2018

UVA alumna and Economics major, Gwendolyn Cassady, launches sewing shop for Afghan Refugees

Feature | 12/28/2017

Former Economics undergraduate, Amanda Pallais, contributed to "research that mattered most in 2017"

Feature | 10/09/2017

ARTICLE- WHY YOU SHOULD CHOOSE A CAREER IN SALES

"Brian Tracy describes sales as the "ultimate default career." By that, he means that many people get into sales because they can't find any other job that pays them what they need. Some of the top sales professionals in the world will admit that they had no intention of getting into or staying in the sales industries, yet most wouldn't change their decision to stay. But while sales may be a default occupation, there are several reasons why you should choose a career in sales instead of being a salesperson until something else opens up." - Thomas Phelps 

Click here to read the rest of the article. 

Feature | 01/13/2017

Three UVA ECON Grads Publish Paper with Prof. Steve Stern (Stony Brook)

Variation in mental illness and provision of public mental health services

Authors: UVA Grads: William C. Johnson, Michael LaForest, Brett Lissenden & Prof. Steven Stern (Stony Brook).

Published recently in Health Services and Outcomes Research Methodology, this paper is an expansion of a previous study by Professor Steven Stern which estimated the local prevalence of mental illness in the Charlottesville area. That earlier paper caught the eye of state senator Creigh Deeds, who recognized how useful it would be to have the analysis extended to the entire state of Virginia. Three Economics graduate students then helped Professor Stern estimate the prevalence of mental illness within 30 geographical regions in the state of Virginia. After accounting for insurance status, they were able to compare estimates of demand for public mental health services to supply of public mental health services in each of those 30 geographical regions. Over 66,000 uninsured and Medicaid-insured individuals in Virginia were found to be without public mental health services. The deficit varies locally, with several regions having no deficit and others having 5,000 or more untreated people. Though a large portion of the unserved people with mental illness are uninsured, many would be insured for mental health services through Medicaid if Virginia were to accept the Medicaid expansion associated with the Affordable Care Act. The paper's findings suggest that states can better serve populations relying on mental health care by allocating scarce public mental health dollars to localities reflecting their need. The co-authors' results have been presented to a Virginia Senate joint subcommittee on mental health. The chart below shows the deficit of mental health services across Virginia's Community Services Boards for three values of PSUs (primary sampling units).